Six Articles to Fix Your Employee Retention Issue

Love your Job

“An employee’s motivation is a direct result of the sum of interactions with his or her manager.”

~ Bob Nelson~

Client Joan Asks: We’ve been really struggling with an employee retention problem.  I’d like to help my managers determine where the problem may lie and come up with some solutions we can implement to keep our employees productive and happy.

Do you have some articles I could recommend to them that would help?

Coach Joel Answers: I like the direction you are going, Joan.  If you allow your managers to read up on the way other people have resolved this problem, you get some buy in.

Then when they come to the table to discuss their ideas and solutions, you already have them taking ownership of the problem. They will be more interested in working toward a solution.

Here are six articles that will get you started.

1. How Managers Can Improve Their Workplaces for Employees.  Joan, the fact is, most employees leave because of their boss and the management.  The great thing about the suggestions in this article is that you don’t need to bust your budget to accomplish these strategies.

You’ll find seven simple steps you and your managers can take immediately to help retain more employees. Read Employee Retention Article.

2. Ten Ways to Keep Your Star Employees.  Anytime you have top talent, you want to have them happy and secure with you.  One of the issues that surfaces with rising stars is they will not stay if they don’t feel they are doing fulfilling work. Also, if they feel they are totally inundated with work they may become discouraged. Read Star Employees Article.

3. Highly Engaged Workplace.  Sometimes you find workers just “biding their time” at their job.  They don’t feel committed to the work. They stick it out because of the down economy, but don’t feel any loyalty to your company.  This article helps you identify the key things that bring your employees fulfillment.

When you find those benefits and work situation that engages your workers, you change them from “waiting to leave,” to “wanting to stay.”  It changes the entire workplace environment. Read Engaged Workplace Article.

4. How Men and Women in Leadership Can Help Employees Succeed.  When employees are properly trained and feel they are using their skill sets to succeed, they enjoy their jobs more.

Use this article to examine the training opportunities you have in place. Do your workers need tutoring, mentoring, coaching or on-the-job training to feel more valuable?  Are your employees confused about expectations and how you define success? This article will help you evaluate your workers better. Read Help Employees Succeed Article.

5. Give Employees What They Need. Sometimes as you evaluate your employee retention issue, you may discover that you have not given your staff the tools they need to succeed.

When workers stand on uncertain ground, they seek the security of another job.   With this article you’ll find six tips to strengthen your employees’ commitment to succeed at your job instead of looking elsewhere. Read Keep Employees Motivated Article.

6. Why Did They Leave? How to Retain Workers by Surveying Employees After They Resign. What’s the best way to determine whether your employees are happy or unhappy and why? Ask them! This article explains the importance of surveying current employees and provides examples of questions to include on your survey. Read How to Retain Workers Article.

Joan, as your managers look at these employee retention articles, they will see where they can strengthen the workplace and their management skills.  When employees enjoy their job, their manager, their work environment, and their pay you will find your retention problem disappears.

Looking for the solutions to your employee retention issues? Contact Joel for options specifically designed for your situation.

Talkback: What articles have you read lately that could help managers keep their workers satisfied? 

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Begin With the End In Mind:
An Employee Retention Strategy That Works

“While pay and benefits were important, they weren’t real drivers of retention.”

~ Robert Morgan ~

Dianna has found herself, somewhat unexpectedly, on the hot seat. As HR manager for a large manufacturing and distribution company, she is responsible for so much of the day-to-day operation that she has been ignoring some big picture initiatives. Suddenly, the company’s employee retention strategy, or more correctly its lack of one, has risen to #1 on her CEO’s hot list. Dianna starts researching best practices used in companies similar to hers and then calls her direct reports together for a brainstorming session. As Steven Covey advises in Habit #2 of his classic Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, most good personal and corporate strategies begin with the end in mind. Diana knows their turnover rate is way too high, so she and her team begin with the goal of reducing turnover by 30% in the next 12 months. The team agrees that their wages and benefits are highly competitive, so they look for other areas that need attention. They focus on developing three key initiatives that can quickly and directly impact their turnover rate.

  • Tell the whole truth and nothing but
  • Hold managers accountable
  • Put out the welcome mat

1. Tell the whole truth and nothing but.  A good employee retention strategy starts with recruiting. This philosophy applies whether you are using a search firm, posting on an online job board, or running newspaper ads. Employees most often leave a company in the short term because the job was either oversold or undersold. The new employee needs to fully understand what the job involves and this means his or her expectations should be based in reality. Will he be on the phone six hours a day? Will she be dealing with the public? Does the job involve a certain amount of routine or monotony?Management must clearly communicate what the job responsibilities are before an offer is made.

2. Hold managers accountable.Each individual manager must take responsibility for directing the on-boarding process for his or her own employees. This means spending time to acquaint new hires with company policies, procedures, and traditions. Within the first 90 days, the new employee needs to feel totally aligned with the company’s vision and mission, and totally committed to its success. Each manager must develop a training program that not only covers the standard orientation information session but also provides the employee with a personal training and development agenda to be completed within the first 90 to 180 days. The manager also needs to provide a check-in schedule, so that the new employee knows when he will be debriefing or going over personal progress reports with the manager.

3. Put out the welcome mat.Every new employee needs to feel at home from Day One. This means getting ready ahead of time so that there are no missing pieces. All the paperwork is assembled and ready to complete. Someone is available to walk the employee through the how-to, such as enrolling in the insurance program, signing up for the 401-k, the daycare facility, or the softball team. The photo ID badge is issued on the first day so that the new hire doesn’t have to deal with security issues.Someone is designated as the go-to person if questions come up during the first week or two. Most important, every new employee should be put on a team and given a meaningful project or work responsibility to get started on.

Corporate management needs to view employee retention strategies as an investment that pays dividends, not an expense to be avoided. Time and money spent now will add strength to the talent pool and dollars to the bottom line.

Whether it’s an executive coaching program or a strategy development conference, Joel has some answers for you. Contact him today.

 Talkback: Is employee turnover costing you money? Or perhaps you’ve tried a strategy that worked. Tell us about your experience.