6 Strategies for Introverts to Master Office Politics

“When psychologists have looked at who have been the most creative people over time in a wide variety of fields, almost all the people they looked at had serious streaks of introversion.”

~ Susan Cain ~

It seems to Gary that offices are constructed and organized to favor the extrovert.  As an introvert, he finds open office spaces draining. And meetings with rapid give and take showcase extrovert’s social skills, but frustrate him as he takes time to think.

Gary determined to build on his own strengths in the office.  While outgoing people gain energy from being around others, Gary knows he gains energy from solitude and ideas.  Gary values the introverts in his office because they can focus easier and produce more.

Here is Gary’s list of six ways introverts can shine in the world of office politics.

1. Connect with Ideas.  Instead of joining others as they talk about sports, movies or people, Gary starts a conversation about ideas.  He finds common ground with other people when he focuses on thinking topics, not social events.

2. Understand Yourself. Gary recognizes his need for quiet and regeneration.  He accept that in the wide range of personalities, he works best without distractions.

A study discussed in the Harvard Business Review showed introverts responded better to problem solving when the background noise level was lower.  Extroverts performed better with louder noises.

When both you and your boss understand that you will be more productive when you have quiet and solitude to focus, you will benefit. Recognize that others may find synergy in large group discussion.

3. Be Comfortable Being You.  Gary learned his best work practices.  Then he determined to speak up. When necessary, he requests that quiet office—or time in an unused conference room.  Often he suggest meetings hold a few key players instead of multitudes.

Gary got his boss to try “Brainwriting” instead of brainstorming in sessions.  Here each person writes an idea on a piece of paper and passes it to the person next to them.  Once a paper has four to five ideas, the group stops to discuss them.

The quiet and time gives thinkers a better chance to respond. “It’s really helped me add value to the group,” Gary says.  “And even the vocal members like it.  They get to shine when we discuss it.”

Sometimes Gary gets an agenda ahead of time and plans out his thoughts and ideas.

4. Develop Relationships Your Way.  Socializing sometimes seems like a waste of time, but Gary recognizes that we all need relationships.  He schedules 30-45 minutes each day to visit other people.  He just stops by and say hi. “That small talk builds bridges,” he says.

What extroverts call “networking” or “selling yourself,” Gary renames. “Consider it ‘having a conversation’ or getting to know someone and letting them get to know you,” Gary says. “Choose your environment.  I like one-on-one or small groups.”

5. Be fully present for 10 minutes.  When you are with other people, totally focus on them and what’s important to them for a full 10 minutes. “I find I can focus for that 10 minutes,” Gary says. “Then I feel free to move on.

“When you use your strength of focusing and direct it toward others, you make them feel valuable and important.  This builds relationships and trust.”

6. Be Confident in Your Strengths.  Gary learned to value the great strengths he brought to the office.  Studies show that the introvert rises to the top in team building as others value their focus and productivity.  Many of the great creative people have had a more private personality.

Less outgoing people make great leaders.  They are more willing to listen to others ideas.  I think I use other’s strengths and let them run with an assignment,” Gary says. “Introverts are less likely to feel they must put their stamp on the project.”

Work places perform best with a blend of personalities.  Each kind brings their own strengths to the mix. “As you come to trust your strengths and be comfortable seeking ways that allow you to be the most productive, you can thrive,” Gary says. “Then office politics are no longer a struggle for the introvert.”

Trying to figure out how to shine at your office?  Contact Joel for a personalized assessment of your strengths and a blueprint on how to move up.

Talkback: Introvert?  What is your best coping skill? Extrovert?  How do you connect with introverts?

Jobs and Careers
for Introverts

Introvert Poster

 

“Figure out what you are meant to contribute to the world and make sure you contribute it. If this requires public speaking or networking or other activities that make you uncomfortable, do them anyway. But accept that they’re difficult, get the training you need to make them easier, and reward yourself when you’re done.”
~Susan Cain, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking~

Kevin works as a compliance officer for an insurance company. “I have always been an introvert,” Kevin said.  “I really enjoy quiet, alone time.”

He looked for careers that would be suitable to his introverted personality. “They say that engineers, scientists, accounting are all great jobs for introverts.  But I hated math,” he said.

Sophia Dembling, author of The Introvert’s Way: Living a Quiet Life in a Noisy World says, “What careers are good for introverts?  Whatever interests them.”

Kevin realized he couldn’t be in tech fields, because they just didn’t interest him.  Rather, he chose a field he loved and then figured out how to adjust to it.

Every job has a mix of skills that require both quiet time and time with others. Introverts can adjust and balance those times.

Use Your Strengths

Introverts are good listeners.  They can be quiet and give others the opportunity to share.  They can think and ponder.

“When I talk with others on compliance issues, I find they are much more amenable to doing things the necessary way after I’ve given them a chance to talk and explain their position,” Kevin said. “Sometimes they bring up valid points.  But in any case, they feel like they’ve been heard and understood. It makes my job easier.”

Introverts can use quiet time efficiently.

“I have a program or a pattern I use that works for me,” Kevin says. “When I get to my office, and it’s quiet, I accomplish a lot.”

Structure Your Work to Suit You

There are times when things get very busy and Kevin needs to interact with people… sometimes with high emotional content.  He organizes and balances his work time to regenerate.

1. Take a Break. There may be times introverts just need to step out and take a break.  Lunch time may be taken in the car, at a quiet park or even in the library.

You may schedule breaks to take a rest from the din.  You know your capacity. You know your work location.  Find quiet spots to restore your equilibrium.

2. Turn it off.  When Kevin comes back to the office after stressful meetings, he turns off the phone.  He hangs a sign on the door that says, “Focusing. If you’re not dead or dying, please don’t disturb.”

He has trained his colleagues to respect his time for silence and thought.

“It’s not just introverts that need quiet to focus,” Kevin said.  “In our office many others have taken to scheduling blocks of time for focused work.  They tell me they are amazed at how much they accomplish.”

Kevin said he’s learned that as he understands and takes care of himself, he’s more successful. “Introverts can succeed at any job,” Kevin says. “Who’s to label these jobs introvert jobs and those extrovert jobs?  Steve Martin, the actor, is an introvert. Warren Buffet’s an introvert.  People in sales can be introverts and still be very successful.”

Kevin’s advice:  Choose the job you love and you’ll figure out how to make it work for you.

Need help figuring out how to adjust your job to your introvert tendencies?  Contact Joel for individualized assistance.

Talkback:  How have you adjusted or arranged your job to support you as an introvert?

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Help for the Introvert Personality:
How to Get Your Needs Met at Work

Introvert Tag

“You know you’re an introvert when you get excited about cancelled plans.”

~ Anonymous ~

Ryan is at a crossroads in his career. He’s been with the same company for five years, working in IT as a programmer. He gets along well with his co-workers and his manager thinks he’s doing a great job. Lately, however, he’s started to wonder if he should look for a change. He’d like to move up in the company, but all the hot jobs with great prospects are in sales. There’s a sales job that’s just been posted and he’s thinking of applying. But he feels uncomfortable every time he thinks about it. His brain is going in circles so he decides to call his business coach and run the idea by her.

Ryan’s coach asks him a number of questions about what the new job would look like. Would he be spending a lot of time on the phone, making calls and setting up appointments? Would he have a lot of tight deadlines and pressure to meet sales targets? Would he be working independently or would he be part of a team? Would he be in a position to do a lot of networking, attending meetings and public events? Ryan answers “yes” to all her questions.

“Clearly you have an introvert personality,” she told him. “All these activities that you’re describing generally make introverts very uncomfortable. It’s certainly possible for an introvert to succeed in some types of sales jobs. But before you decide to take your career in a whole new direction, I think there are three things you need to do:

  • Be yourself
  • Find your niche
  • Learn to compensate.

Ryan decides to do some further research and self-analysis before he makes a decision. If you’re contemplating a job change, you might want to follow these steps as well.

1. Be yourself. When you’re interviewing for a new job, whether it’s with your present company or a brand new management job, don’t be tempted to fake it. A job interview is where a potential boss or employer gets to know the “real you.” It’s his or her opportunity to see if you’re right for the job. But it’s not a one-sided deal. It’s also your opportunity to be who you are and see if the job is right for you. If you like to work independently, with little or no supervision, don’t brag about your teamwork skills!

2. Find your niche. A recent study conducted by CareerBuilder found that extroverts were more likely to rise higher in management ranks, by 22 percent compared with 18 percent of introverts. “The data does indicate that extroverts may be better suited for higher-level positions, many of which involve a lot of collaboration and public speaking,” says Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder. “But that doesn’t mean an introvert can’t still rise high in a company. It may be the case that many of the respondents began as introverts and gradually became more extroverted as the situation demanded.”

Here’s the key question to ask yourself: How comfortable will I be as an introvert in extrovert’s clothing? Can I play that role for an hour a day? Eight hours a day? Every day? Is this a skill I want to learn or am I going too much against the grain?

3. Learn to compensate. If you’re already in a job that’s not exactly your cup of tea, or if you’re contemplating a new opportunity that may take you outside your comfort zone, develop a game plan. First of all, be honest with your boss and your co-workers. If you’d enjoy setting up the trade show exhibit, volunteer to take that on if someone else will make the follow-up calls.

Pace yourself and don’t get into stimulation overload. That’s a sure loser for any introvert personality. If you’ve spent all day meeting with clients, skip the happy hour festivities with the gang and take a solo walk or do some yoga instead. If you’ve had a week of high-pressure deadlines, spend your weekend in low-key activities rather than shopping and socializing.

After some soul-searching and in-depth conversations with his boss and his human resources department, Ryan decides to develop an upward mobility plan in IT. He takes on some new projects and starts to develop his management skills so he’ll be ready to move up when the opportunity occurs.

Knowledge is power. Know yourself. Know your strengths and your weaknesses. Know what you want and how much you’re willing to change to get it. As Ricky Nelson crooned in his hit song, Garden Party, “You can’t please everyone, so you’ve got to please yourself.”

Are you wondering if a job or career change is right for you? Contact Joel today. He can help you sort through your options and make the right decision.

Talkback: Are you an introvert in an extrovert world? Have you developed some coping strategies that work? Share your ideas here.

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Square Pegs in Round Holes:
Career Choices for Introverts

Square Pegs in Round Holes

“Telling an introvert to go to a party is like telling a saint to go to Hell.”

~ Criss Jami ~

Client Emily Asks:  I feel totally out of place and uncomfortable in my job. I’m a marketing manager for a major entertainment company and I’m surrounded by people who are constantly running in high gear and bouncing off the walls. I get so stressed out, some days I just want to crawl into a hole. I know I’m an introvert and I think I need a total career makeover. But I’ve invested a lot of myself in getting ahead with this company and I hate to blow it off. What should I do?

Coach Joel Answers: Taking a close look at your level of job satisfaction is never a bad thing to do. Based on your description, I’d say you’re probably an introvert in a career that’s populated by extroverts. Statistics tell us that 12-25% of people in the general population are true introverts. The rest are either partial or total extroverts. If that’s true, then it’s easy to see why you feel like a square peg trying to fit into a round hole. Here are three things you could start doing immediately to change your situation.

• Evaluate
• Plan
• Train

1. Evaluate. Take a close look at who you are vs. where you are.  Think about your strengths, passions, interests, and hobbies. Perhaps you love to read, write in your journal, listen to music, take walks, and play with your dog or cat. You probably thrive on solitude and feel drained if you spend too much time with other people. If you’re in a high pressure, hyperactive job, you should determine if your “quiet” needs can be met on that job or if you can get enough alone time off the job to feel satisfied. For example, can you close your office door and work on your own a good share of the time? Can you eat lunch away from the crowd, spend an hour alone at the gym or taking a solo walk?

Evaluate your company as well. Since you’ve put in a lot of time and energy there, see if there’s a way to stay with the company in a position that allows you to work more on your own and less with other people. You may want to talk to your boss or someone in HR to lay the groundwork for a possible job change, even if it’s a lateral move.

2. Plan. Changing careers or even jobs is not like buying a new pair of socks. You need a solid plan, a step-by-step process to get you from Point A to Point B. The first step is to look at your career thus far (marketing) and see what jobs within that field might be a better fit. For example, could you shift into graphic design or market research—both careers that allow you to spend a lot of time flying solo.

If you feel that a job change within your current field is not possible or practical, then you may want to plan for a complete career change. Test yourself, first of all, to get a clearer picture of what specific career fields might be a good fit. There are many internet sites that offer free self-analysis tests and career recommendations. You may want to work with a career coach who can help you cut through some of the clutter and develop a solid plan. You could also invest in one or more career guides or workbooks that could provide valuable insights.

3. Train. You may choose a short term solution, such as staying in the same company or field but in a new job. If that is your choice, see what training opportunities the company might offer, either in-house, on line, or perhaps even a subsidized degree program. If you design a longer-term plan that involves a complete career change, what will it be? People on the introvert side of the spectrum lean toward professions such as law, accounting, research, or technology.

The bottom line is this: what will make YOU happy? What can you do now to feel more fulfilled, more excited, and more of who you really are? When you have answers to those questions, you’ll be on the right path toward a fulfilling career.

If you’re feeling stressed or out of place in your current career, Joel can provide you with helpful advice and direction. Contact him today. 

Talkback: Have you made a career change that worked for you? Or have you found ways to get more of what you need in your current job? Share your experience here.

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