The Seven Steps to Success in Your New Management Job

Person on Phone

“You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You must do the thing you think you cannot do.”

~ Eleanor Roosevelt ~

While it’s hard to walk into a new job, sometimes the most difficult jobs to take are in-company promotions.  You have the advantage, of course, of being familiar with the company and its policies.  You know the work and the people.  But… you need to transition from peer to boss.

In a job in a new company, you can more easily step into that leadership role, but you must get to know the people, the policies, the company and the workload.  How can you step into this new management job and be successful regardless of the new circumstances?

Here are seven steps to help—whether it’s a new job or an in-house promotion.

1. Talk to your boss.  You want to clearly understand your role.  What does he or she expect of you in this new position?  What are your added responsibilities?  You might ask the boss how he has dealt with a similar transition. How did he relate to his former peers?  Don’t just talk at the start of the new job.  Keep in frequent contact with your boss asking for feedback on your performance on a regular basis.  That way, you can make sure you don’t stray far from his or her goals without correction.

2. Remember why you were promoted. Sometimes, when we’ve been working with talented successful professionals, we wonder why we were chosen over them.  There’s always a reason. Make a list of your skills and talents.  Look at the projects you’ve accomplished and the value you’ve brought to the company.  You are ready and capable of taking this step.  Own it.

3.  Read up.  Your new management job may call for new skills.  Certainly you will need to step up your leadership qualities.  Read books on management and leadership.  Schedule your time to include learning leadership skills for your new role.

4. Consider coaching or finding a mentor.  When you are in a new job, you’re uncomfortable.  There’s so much to learn.  At times like this, an experienced voice can be invaluable.  If there is someone you admire within the company, take him or her to lunch and ask for advice.  Most people are generous when they know you’re interested in learning.  If there are no mentors at hand, you may want to hire an experienced coach to streamline your progress.

5. Choose leadership.  When you are interacting with former peers, it’s easy to slip back into old ways.  Even in new situations there are times where you can to choose to be a leader or choose to minimize yourself.  Be aware of those times. Be conscious of them.  Then make the decision to lead.

6. Give yourself time. When you’re new to your job, you can’t expect to be perfect right away.  Not any more than a young basketball player can have the same skill sets as a Michael Jordan. You can, however, practice like he practices and value what he values.  As a new manager deliberately make choices to lead.

7. Adapt management attributes. Make a list of all the qualities a great manager has.  Perhaps you’ll list organization, follow through, listening, authority, decisiveness, or integrity.  Each day write one of these qualities in a place you’ll see it throughout the day.  Make each action, decision, email or interaction deliberately considering this quality.  Own the quality for the day.   As you do this each day, these attributes will become yours.

Whether you are promoted from within or hired from outside, these seven steps can assure you fill that new management job successfully… and set yourself up so you can advance again.

If you have questions about your new job, contact Joel.

Talkback: What have been some of the difficulties you’ve faced in a new management job?  What tips can you give others to successfully overcome new leadership challenges?

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Change your Current Job into Your Dream Job

Lady Dayderaming

“Champions don’t become champions in the ring- they are merely recognized there. If you want to see where someone develops into a champion, look at his daily routine”

~ John Maxwell ~

 

Some people slog through life thinking, This is as good as it gets. They put in hours, take their paycheck, and find joy someplace else.

It doesn’t have to be that way for you. There’s a way you can find satisfaction in your current place of employment.  You won’t stay in the same spot. Instead, I’ll show you four quick ways to take your career to another level while sticking with the security of your current employer.

  • Write your dream job description.
  • Find areas in your current job that match your dream job
  • Look to add value around you
  • Delegate the dregs

1. Write your dream job description. Everyone deserves to go to work with eagerness and delight at what they day will bring.  They should work from their strengths and core values. Fulfillment comes when you feel you are making a meaningful difference.

The first step to create your dream job is to define what it is—and what it is not.  Sometimes this is harder than you think!  Then a career coach can help you find those insights and core values that motivate you to succeed.

If you don’t know what makes you happy, you’ll have a hard time defining your ideal job.  So take time to carefully study what your strengths are and what you’d like to spend the majority of your time doing.

2. Find areas in your current job that match your dream job. Look at your current responsibilities. Which ones do you enjoy doing? Which types of responsibilities fit with your dream job description?

These are the ones you want to expand on.  Look for ways to increase the amount of time you spend on these jobs.  Perhaps a co-worker hates the very work you love.  You could look at taking on some of that added responsibility. As you work to your strengths, you will shine.

3. Look to add value around you.  Because you are skilled in your “dream areas,” you have a nice level of expertise in them.  Continue to grow that expertise.  Be available to take on extra work in that area.  Because it’s fun for you and you enjoy it, it won’t feel like work.

Because you are eager to assume that responsibility, you’ll earn the gratitude and recognition of your bosses.  You may become the go-to person for that area of the work.  More work will come your way, and soon, you’ll have merged into your dream career.

Your added value will make it easy to then ask for the pay you want.

4. Delegate the Dregs. You also want to look at the parts of your job you hate. Find an honorable way to do less of them. Because every person has different strengths and skills, one of your co-workers may love that job.  Look for ways to trade jobs so you can get the ones you love and your co-workers take from you the ones you hate.

Sometimes just getting rid of the worst jobs can help you love your job more—especially if it frees up time for those projects you love.

As you take these four steps, you can morph your current job into your dream job. Write your dream job description.  Expand your value to the company by sharing your strengths and delegating jobs you don’t like. Get the satisfaction you deserve.

Joel’s career coaching opens up opportunities to discover your strengths and find or create your dream job. Take that next step in your career today!  Find joy in your work now. Email Joel and learn how to find your dream job—or even how to change your current job into that dream job.

Talkback:  How have you moved into your areas of strength?  Have you ever given some of the jobs you hated to someone who liked them?  What tips can you give others to change their job for the better?

Image courtesy of iconmac / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

My Job Isn’t Satisfying:
Changing Careers at 30, 40, or Even 50

Career Change Sign

“Often people attempt to live their lives backwards: They try to have more things, or more money, in order to do more of what they want so that they will be happier. The way it actually works is the reverse. You must first be who you really are, then, do what you need to do, in order to have what you want.”

~ Margaret Young ~

Annie Asks: The job I have is not satisfying. I’ve been doing it for over twelve years. I don’t know what I like to do. How do I figure this out and find a career that is fulfilling for me?

Joel Answers: For most people, changing careers is a process, not an overnight, snap decision. You know you are unsatisfied in your current position, and you’re exploring your options. That’s the first—and often the hardest—step in the process. The good news is that you can change careers at any age or stage in your career. Whether you’re changing careers at 30 or 45, the process is still the same. Here are some tips to help you discover your dream job, regardless of how old you are or how long you’ve been in your current position.

  1. Think about what you really love to do.
    For now, don’t try to make this work or career-related. Don’t think about what kind of work you love to do; think about what you love to do in your free time. Do you garden? Spend time with your grandkids? Putter around in your workshop? What really makes you happy? Any one of these things could be the foundation of a new career. What is it that you do in your own time that really makes your heart sing?
  2. Consider ways to make what you love into a career.
    Once you have determined what makes you happy, think of ways that you might be able to turn that activity into a new career. If you love to garden, you could start a nursery, go to work for a greenhouse, become a landscaper, or even teach others about gardening. If you love spending time with your grandkids, you might enjoy working with other people’s children as well. A career as a teacher or daycare director might be right up your alley. For the workshop hobbyist, making and selling handcrafted furniture can be extremely fulfilling and profitable.
  3. Get help from a career coach.
    If you’ve tried coming up with ways to turn one of the things you love into a career but you’re still stuck, consider turning to a career coach for help. A good coach will guide you through the career change process and help you find the right career for you.

If you’re unhappy in your career, the time to get started searching for a new career is now. Even if you’re just 30 or 35, changing careers is hard, but as you get older, it gets even harder. If you’re young now, don’t wait until you’re 45 or 50 to think about changing careers. Older workers often face more of a challenge starting over in a new career due to reluctance on the part of employers to hire an older worker to fill an entry-level position.

If you are changing careers in mid-life or later, first read my article, “5 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Pursuing Your Dream Job,” then consider ways that you might be able to combine aspects of your old job with your new career. For example, if you are a sales manager now, you might have an easier time changing industries if you accept a position in sales in that industry first, then pursue the position you really want after you’ve gained some experience in the industry.

Do you need help finding your dream job? Fill out the career assessment on the Dream Job Coaching website to receive a personalized response from Joel.

Talkback: Are you in the process of making a career change or have you successfully completed one? Tell us about it below or leave a question for a future Q&A with Joel.

3 Mistakes to Avoid When Trying to Find Your Dream Job

Dream Job Venn Graph
“Luck is a matter of preparation meeting opportunity.”

~ Oprah Winfrey ~

Are you trying to find your dream job? One approach is to have a solid online presence and online marketing strategy. With that said, how you project yourself online can make or break your job search efforts. Here are 3 deadly mistakes you can’t afford to make when using the Internet to find your dream job:

  1. Relying on just online marketing. If you think applying to hundreds of jobs online gives you a better chance of landing your dream job, you’re dead wrong. Imagine thousands of applicants aspiring for the same job. This could spell disaster for you and for the employer who posted the job. Could this mean many employers may choose not to post the job online?  From my experience I know this: the best jobs are never posted but are found through networking and contacts. If you want to find your dream job, you can’t limit your search to online job boards.
  2. Focusing on quantity not quality. There are literally hundreds of social media portals out there. Trying to post your online profile on all of them is like spreading your net out as wide as you can but not catching anything at the end of the day. A better approach is to focus on building your online profile on some of the most popular and well-respected sites out there. LinkedIn is a good example. Focus on one or two sites to demonstrate your skills, experience, make contacts and build positive relationships in your industry.
  3. Playing the waiting game. One of the worst things you can do is to build your online profile and NOT do anything after that. Don’t assume people will land on your profile, contact you and hand you your dream job on a silver platter. You’ve got to work hard with online networking. Connect with people offline and tell them to connect with you on LinkedIn, for example. Join industry-related groups and be a part of the conversation. Leave helpful comments on other people’s posts. Demonstrate that you’re an expert in your niche. All of this will help increase your visibility at work, which just might catch the eye of a headhunter or your future employer.

Understand that without a doubt, potential recruiters are going to look you up online. Maintaining a strong online profile is essential to finding your dream job. However, a successful job search program or plan does not only involve having an online presence and using online marketing.

Traditional methods like using influence, getting others to perceive you positively, and building your brand are equally if not more important to get ahead in your career.

So the next time you connect with someone online, also remember to network face-to-face, recruit a person of influence to hand-deliver your resume to the HR manager, and assume that your prospective employer will be conducting a search for you on Google. With all the right elements put into place you’ll be well on your way to finding the job of your dreams.

Looking for concrete tips on building your online profile? Read this blog post or schedule an appointment with Joel Garfinkle to get the dream job coaching you need to succeed!

Image: Phaitoon / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

5 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Pursuing Your Dream Job

Dare Dream Do by Whitney L. Johnson

“When we dream we make meaning of life, discover the essence of ourselves, truly grow up, and most importantly, model for children how to dream.”

~ Whitney L. Johnson ~

Years ago, an associate of mine was working in a job that had already made him more money than most Americans earn in a lifetime. Right out of college, he landed a position with a major tech company and helped design several iterations of the world’s leading networking equipment.

Some might call my associate’s career a study in success—a perfect example of how a smart, hard-working, enterprising individual could still do great things in America. Only, the man wasn’t happy. In fact, he was miserable. He was tired of networks and technology and wished his life had taken a different direction. In other words, he felt trapped.

He was also paralyzed by fear. He attributed most of his success to luck, circumstances, and youthful enthusiasm. More than halfway through his life, how could he dramatically change its trajectory, yet still meet all of his financial obligations? More importantly, did he have what it took to do something new?

The man eventually hired me as a career coach, and several months later he made the transition into a C-level position at a leading nonprofit organization. When he and I reflected on his success, he said, “I think it’s the questions we discussed, the ones right at the beginning, that made it all possible. Once I realized I could answer them all in the affirmative, I knew I had what it took to make a change.”

Those questions are reproduced here:

  1. Can you invest hours of your free time in learning something new? Most people’s dream job—whether it’s a director of marketing, a boarding school history teacher, or a chief information officer—requires a high degree of expertise in a diverse set of specialized skills. Those skills take time, effort, and intentional practice to master.
  2. Are you willing to accept rejection? It’s the extremely rare individual who lands his or her dream job on the first interview. Just as J. K. Rowling received dozens of rejection letters before having her first Harry Potter manuscript accepted, most dream job seekers will have to deal with being turned away by HR.
  3. Do you know how to talk with people? Whether it’s fair or not, few people will recognize your expertise and value if you don’t introduce yourself to them. Old-fashioned networking is essential to finding most dream jobs. The more people know or hear about you, the more likely they will be to hire you—or point you in the direction of the perfect opportunity.
  4. Can you discipline your thinking and achieve emotional detachment? For most people, one of the biggest barriers to landing their dream job is self doubt. The human subconscious has a negativity bias by default, which leads us to constantly question our plans. Thankfully, practice and mindfulness can transform our thinking and dramatically decrease self doubt.
  5. Are you willing to put happiness above money? According to psychological researchers, earning more than $75,000 per year (adjusted for local COL) doesn’t contribute to the average American’s overall level of emotional well-being. While not every dream job comes with a pay cut, some do; others may require substantial education or relocation costs.

If you’re interested in reading more about how to find your dream job, my friend Whitney Johnson has a new book out titled Dare, Dream, Do: Remarkable Things Happen When You Dare to Dream, which is available at bookstores nationwide, as well as on all major online retailers, including AmazonB&N, and Indiebound.

Talkback: Are you working at your dream job, or is it “just a job”? How would you answer the five questions above? Are you willing to do what it takes to find your dream job?