Four Ways to Break Career Stagnation

“I believe ambition is not a dirty work, it’s believing in yourself and your abilities. Imagine this: what would happen if we were all brave enough to believe in our own ability, to be a little more ambitious. I think the world would change.” ~ Reese Witherspoon ~

Aaron felt like he was stuck. The job just seemed like a treadmill. The same thing over and over. When he took the job 8 years ago, he had visions of promotions and advancement. Now? Not so much.

As Aaron took stock of his career he decided to combat the stagnation. Surely there was a way to get around it. He just couldn’t figure it out on his own. He hired Joel to be his executive coach.

Part of it involved recording exactly what he was doing so he could be prepared and present it as needed.

  1. Sharing accomplishments. Words disappear and can’t always be remembered. Aaron saw the value in sharing his accomplishments through writing. He wrote a weekly message updating management on the projects he was working on.

    He included the challenges he’d overcome and the progress he’d made. The make sure to explain how his work affected the progress of the job. And how the job would impact the company. This gave Aaron confidence his job was valuable and productive
  2. Meeting Preparation. Aaron doesn’t think fast on his feet. He works better when he has a chance to mull over ideas. This is true of most introverts. So Aaron decided to write out notes about what he wanted to say before meetings.

    If you want to say something at a meeting or event, take the time to write it out beforehand. This way you can organize your thoughts, focus on what is essential, and not be fumbling for words when it’s your turn to speak. When you have something prepared, it makes it more likely that you will speak clearly and professionally. And you say what you intended to say.
  3. Prepare for and schedule one-on-one meetings. Again, if you have an agenda you want to cover, writing an outline of the topics can give you confidence going into the meeting. One-on-ones are a great opportunity to talk about your work and how it affects the company.

    This is a great time to discuss your concerns about your career stagnation. Meetings with your boss can help you formulate a plan for your transition into the next step of your career.
  4. Volunteer for committees and events. Participating in a committee or helping to host a conference or charity event translates to an abundance of networking opportunities. Aaron found that committees and events gave him the opportunity to meet new people, talk about his work, and put his name and face in front of people who wouldn’t normally notice him.

After working this program for several months, Aaron feels much more hopeful. He sees his career stagnation breaking apart. His boss is on board with his goals for a promotion. Many more people know of him and his work. He’s received more praise and people are paying more attention to what he says.

“This is what I was looking for,” Aaron said. “Coaching really helped me. I can’t believe how much more excited I am about my job and its potential.”

If you’re feeling stuck and have work stagnation in your position, Joel Garfinkle provides executive coaching. He can give you individualized help and support to move your career to the next level.

Talkback:
How have you pushed back against career stagnation?

Break these Five Bad Social Media Habits at Work

“Like all technology, social media is neutral but is best put to work in the service of building a better world.” ~ Simon Mainwaring ~

Ellen Asks: One of my friends told me the boss watched how much time we spent on social media. I don’t want to get in trouble. How can I tell if I have bad social media habits at work?

Joel Answers: Social Media can keep us connected, speed communication, and increase productivity. But it can also be a distraction and a time waster. If you suspect you might be misusing social media, check out these six potential problems.

If you don’t eliminate these problems, you might get fired… or at least reduce your chances for a promotion.

  1. Wasting Time on Social Media. Do you check tweets, Facebook, and other social media multiple times at work? If you’re not sure, try the old rubber band trick. Put a rubber band loosely around your wrist. Every time you check non-work related media, snap the rubber band. Sore wrist? Chances are you’re overdoing the viewing.

    Instead of focusing on what interests you, consider the value you are offering the company. Limit Facebook to breaks, lunch, or other non-work time.
  2. Sending the Wrong Message. Be very careful of inappropriate post or tweets. There have been news reports of people fired for off-color or socially insensitive posts. Things are never private on social media. Tweets criticizing former or current employers— or even clients, or coworkers— have a way of turning up in the wrong hands.

    Instead, look for positive things to say about workers or employers. Save the negative for private conversations.
  3. Betraying Your Brand. You’ve worked hard to create a professional brand at work. But poor behavior on social media can damage your image. If you lash out, flame, or attack with meanness other points of view, it can come back to haunt you. Take care how you address politics or politically correct topics to be sure they are not offensive to others.

    Instead, consider the brand you want to present. The authentic you will behave in a way that reflects your brand at work, at home, and on social media.
  4. Inappropriate pictures. There are many kinds of good photos you can post to social media. Inappropriate pictures will, again, tarnish your professional image. Avoid photos that are suggestive or portray you in a questionable light. Avoid posting pictures of your fun trip— the trip you took when your boss thought you were home sick. Instead, use images to create the perception you want others to have of you.
  5. Dishonesty. Be very careful of misrepresenting yourself and your qualifications on social media. It’s a bad habit to suggest you have credentials or job experience you do not have. Instead, review your profiles and posts to reflect your best you. Work to improve yourself so you can accurately show accolades.

You asked a great question, Ellen. Taking care of your social media presentation and the time you spend there can have a significant impact on your work. Use it to strengthen your brand and showcase your abilities instead of it being a distraction. Then you can turn social media into a good work habit.

Need pointers on how to increase your visibility and strengthen you image? Contact Joel for executive coaching.

Talkback:
How have you overcome bad social media habits at work?

The 6 Biggest Reasons Why Unhappy Employees Quit Their New Jobs

“Employees who believe that management is concerned about them as a whole person – not just an employee – are more productive, more satisfied, more fulfilled. Satisfied employees mean satisfied
customers, which leads to profitability.” ~Anne M. Mulcahy, former CEO of Xerox~

Client Theresa asks:
Over the past year, two great employees on my team quit their new job. I was floored. I didn’t see any signs that they were unhappy. We lost a huge amount of talent, and it set us back substantially. How can I improve employee retention?

Coach Joel answers:
Theresa, the six biggest reasons why employees choose to quit their new job within the first 180 days relates to their job satisfaction. Keep employees happy and fulfilled in their work, and retention is likely to be high. However, if your company is failing in even one of these six ways, it’s likely to push employees to look for better opportunities elsewhere. The good news is that as their manager, you have the ability to remedy any of these six major issues that may be influencing employees’ decisions to leave. Of course, you should also be asking your unhappy employees why they’ve quit their new job when they leave, which might highlight other areas in which to improve.

  1. Lack of opportunities to grow
    To thrive in their workplace, employees need opportunities to grow their skills and talent. This isn’t just about career advancement. It’s about feeling satisfied by their work and taking pride in their ability to improve their performance and increase their responsibility. Employees need to work toward goals that are ambitious but achievable, so they’ll feel driven to come to work each day. Setting work performance goals together will ensure they stay motivated.
  2. Poor working relationships
    A poor relationship with a boss or coworkers will make an employee dread coming to work. Furthermore, when an employee has a poor relationship with a boss, she won’t benefit from the guidance and encouragement that a good boss provides. As the manager, you need to overcome any personality conflicts that exist in order to provide the best support possible for your people. Additionally, you need to take note of any clashes that are arising between coworkers, and to mediate these situations as needed. Set the tone for a harmonious workplace culture by cultivating strong relationships with all of your employees, and make it clear that you expect the same from them.
  3. Not understanding the big picture
    When employees don’t understand how their contributions fit into the overall vision of the company, they won’t take as much pride in their work. For their work to feel meaningful, they need to have a strong grasp of how it fits into the company’s goals. That’s why it’s important to talk about vision at team meetings and one-on-one check-ins. Help employees understand how each team objective fits into the vision, and how their own daily work fits into the big picture, and watch their enthusiasm for their work grow.
  4. Not feeling respected and appreciated
    A few words of genuine appreciation each day can make a tremendous difference. Make “thank you” a core part of your vocabulary, and say it for the little things as well as the big things. When employees go the extra mile, recognize them for it in an extra special way. Send an email to the whole workplace that explains what they did, or take a couple of moments during a workplace event to tell everyone about it. These gestures cost nothing and take little time, yet they make a dramatic difference in employees’ level of job satisfaction. Recognizing their contributions to the whole team, including higher-ups, will also boost their opportunities for advancement, which employees will truly appreciate.
  5. Not having their needs met
    If you don’t periodically check in with employees about what they need, they might not feel they can voice their needs. This can lead to a downward spiral of frustration and despair, leading unhappy employees to quit their new job because they don’t see another option. A parent with young children who is having difficulty balancing family and work demands might want flex-time or the ability to telecommute part-time, for instance. Ask employees how they need to feel more supported, and engage in creative brainstorming with them to find solutions.
  6. Fears about the future
    The direction the company is headed in will also influence employees’ decision to stay or jump ship. If promotion opportunities are slim, or there’s a chance their job could be eliminated, they’ll naturally start looking elsewhere. You may not have control over these issues, but you can and should communicate with higher-ups about employees’ need for reassurance. Transparency is key—if employees are left in the dark about potential changes, the rumor mill will create fear and uncertainty. Seeking input and solutions from employees will make them feel invested in the change rather than blindsided by it.

Again, the good news is that when you eliminate these six factors that lead people to quit their new job, unhappy employees are likely to stay. You’ll also have a team of more loyal, dedicated, and passionate employees. By addressing these issues, you’ll become a stronger leader who gets better results from your people.

Call to Action:
Ask yourself which of these six areas you need to improve in. Consider a surveying your employees to find out what would make them more satisfied, too. Then, take at least one step every day to remedy the problem. Email Joel to discuss your progress.

Talkback:
Have you tried implementing the solutions described in this article? How did employees respond?

Four Solutions If You’re Feeling Overworked and Underappreciated at Work

“Phrases like ‘overworked and underpaid’ perpetuate that feeling.” ~ Lena Bottos ~

Steven put in extra-long hours on the project at work. It was highly technical and exceptionally difficult. When he was done, his boss offered no praise and Steven found himself feeling totally underappreciated.

He felt upset and bitter. How could they not appreciate all the work he was doing? He fumed for a few days. Then he stopped to figure out how he could get back on even keel. He really liked the kind work he was doing. He needed to find ways to be happy again.

Steven started working on a list. What could he control?

  • Enjoyment of work. Steven decided he could focus on his enjoyment of the work and the satisfaction it brought him. He could savor the tough solution to the problem and acknowledge that he did a great job. Even if others didn’t see it, it didn’t diminish his work.
  • Praise yourself. Write down what you accomplished each day. Tell yourself you did a good job. Even say it out loud, “That was GOOD work!”
  • Reward yourself. Steven decided that after each project he accomplished, he would reward himself with a nice dinner out or an extra round of golf.
  • Expect less. In truth, people seldom get praised for doing the job they are supposed to do. Bosses are busy. Getting paid and lack of criticism are implicit signs you are doing a good job.

As Steven worked on these tasks, it seemed to help a little, but he still felt overworked and underappreciated at work.

He talked to a friend to get more suggestions. His mentor asked a deep question. “How long have you felt this way? Is it the job, or have you felt undervalued for a long time?” Steven through back to the last jobs he’d had. Yes, it was a common problem.

His friend suggested this deep-seeded feeling could come from childhood rejection or lack of validation long ago. The friend suggested journaling to reveal the source and work to overcome it. Steven also considered counseling to quickly overcome this and move forward.

The counselor talked about “love languages” and suggested there are “appreciation languages” as well. “What does appreciation look like to you?” he asked. The boss may send a “Good job” email, but if you expect a promotion or public accolades, you may still feel underappreciated.

Steven decided to talk to his boss about the kind of validation he was looking for. At the same time, he worked to make it clearer to his boss exactly what he was doing. He realized the boss could not show appreciation if he didn’t understand exactly what Steven was doing.

Finally, Steven decided that if he valued appreciation he should extend it to others as well. He made a plan to praise his co-workers for the good work they were doing. Then, he decided even those below him and his boss were pretty overworked and deserved praise as well.

He found that when he praised others he felt better. He also noticed they seemed quicker to offer affirmation to the work he was doing. Three months later Steven looked back. He realized he no longer felt overworked and underappreciated at work. These seven solutions had helped him feel more valued and more included. His enjoyment at work had increased.

If you are struggling with feelings of overwork or being underappreciated contact Joel for executive coaching. He can guide you in further ways to get the recognition you deserve.

Talkback:
What have you done when you’ve felt over worked and underappreciated?

Four Effective Habits to Combat Demotivatiors at Work

“There is no[thing] better than adversity. Every defeat, every heartbreak, every loss, contains its own seed, its own lesson on how to improve your performance the next time.” ~Malcolm X~

When Stacy started work, she found it exciting and rewarding. She felt she was moving up and making a difference. But lately, when she walks in the door at work she feels drained and unenthusiastic.

A few weeks ago, Stacy decided to face this frustration. What was going on at work that created a feeling of DE-motivation? What was causing her to be less satisfied with her job and less willing to dig in and get the work done?

She decided to list her concerns and then figure out what to do about it. At the end of the week, Stacy’s list of demotivators at work looked like this:

  1. Micromanagement. When she first started work, she needed some extra help. But now that she was confident in her work, the micromanaging seemed interfering. It made her feel like the boss didn’t trust her.
     
    Solution: Before a project starts, Stacy will talk to the boss about the expected standards and the basic approach. She’ll understand the guiding principles the boss wants to see in the job.

    Stacy knows her boss is a worrier and stresses. So she decides to really work on building trust with excellent work. Also, she’ll try to control the conversation by initiating frequent progress reports to help him see that the work is progressing smoothly. Be detailed and specific. If she has questions, she’ll ask for clarification quickly.

  2. Slow Progress. Stacy had moved from a small company to a larger one. There are so many more layers of management here that it seems to take forever for decisions to be made. She’s suggested some real cost saving initiatives… but nothing seems to happen.
     
    Solution:
    Stacy decides to more closely align her goals with the company goals. She decides to talk with her boss about what is most important in the company’s eyes for her to accomplish. Perhaps what she thinks is important isn’t exactly on target.She also decides to focus on what she can control and do excellent work there, while she waits for progress on some of her ideas.
  3. Rewarding poor performance. Stacy still smarted from a slight from last week. She’d worked overtime on a project why Ernie had been on vacation. Yet in the meeting where the project was presented, Ernie got the praise. Talk about a demotivator!
     
    Solution: Stacy decided to make sure she was the presenter on projects she had major input on. She would prepare comments and speak up more at meetings to make sure people were aware of her contribution. If necessary, she would schedule face-time with the boss on a regular basis to keep him informed on her work.
  4. No connection with co-workers. Stacy had been close to her co-workers at her last job. Here, she felt a bit excluded. She really didn’t have any good friends at work. In fact, she didn’t know much about them at all.
     
    Solution: Stacy decided she needed to reach out and connect on a more personal level. She needed to get to know about her co-workers—their families, hobbies, and interests. She decided to start inviting them out to lunch one-on-one and showing interested in them as a person and not just as a co-worker.

Stacy was surprised to find four things that led to her demotivation at work. But once she made a game plan, she felt excitement come back into her day. Now she had control and could make her plan work. And it wasn’t a surprise to her that after a few more weeks, she had friends among her coworkers, her boss was micromanaging less, and she felt like her performance was accurately recognized. As for the layer of management that made progress slow? She discovered a mentor could also help cut through some of the red tape!

If you have a motivation problem at work executive coach Joel Garfinkle can work with you to find solutions.

Talkback:
Do you ever feel burned out or demotivated? What causes your demotivation? And what have you done about it?