Conduct your OWN performance Review

“I think self-awareness is probably the most important thing towards being a champion.”
~Billie Jean King~

Client Clara asks: I always get so nervous before my annual performance review. How can I calm my nerves and make sure it goes as well as possible?

Coach Joel answers: Performance reviews can be daunting, but being proactive about the process will make it a motivating ritual that you look forward to. By conducting a review of your own performance before you meet with your boss, you’ll have thoughtful answers to all your boss’s questions. Here’s your guide on how to do that.

Frequency

Your boss might conduct performance reviews once a year, every six months, or on a quarterly basis. Forty-eight percent of employees are reviewed annually, and 26% are reviewed less than once a year, says Gallup. More frequent reviews are optimal, allowing you to recollect more of what happened during the review period.

Aim to conduct your own performance review on a quarterly basis. Even if your boss only conducts reviews once a year, you’ll have detailed notes from each quarter to use in preparing for your annual review.

Purpose

According to Gallup’s research, good performance reviews are “achievement-oriented, fair and accurate, and developmental.” Gallup suggests calling them “progress reviews” to emphasize these areas of focus.

In other words, they should be less about a grade and instead focused on utilizing the performance review process to continue developing your skills.

Elements

  1. Evaluating fulfillment of the role
    • Look at the description of your role. Then ask yourself how well you’re fulfilling each of your primary responsibilities.
    • Ask yourself if the expectations are fair, and if you have adequate time and resources to fulfill the role, advises Gallup. If not, determine what changes are necessary.
  2. Reviewing your past goals
    • Look at the work performance goals you set for the period you’re reviewing. Where did you achieve them, and where did you fall short?
    • Analyze what went wrong when your efforts didn’t succeed.
      Make a list of the areas you want to strengthen.
  3. Acknowledging successes
    • List and share your achievements, both concrete and less tangible.
    • Have you developed any new skills, even if you haven’t put them to extensive use yet? Be sure to add them to your list, so you can make them known to your boss.
  4. Examining your leveraging of success
    • Ask yourself how you leveraged your successes, advises Sharon Armstrong in The Essential Performance Review Handbook. Have you effectively used them to boost your visibility and influence?
    • Consider where you could leverage successes better in the future.
    • Create a visibility plan outlining how you’ll do that.
  5. Setting goals
    • Now it’s time to set new goals for the next period. Make sure your goals are SMART—“strategic and specific, measurable, attainable, results-based, and time-bound”—emphasize Anne Conzemius and Jan O’Neill in The Power of SMART Goals.
    • Consider what actions you’ll need to take to reach your goals. For example, if you want a promotion, look at options in your company and prepare a compelling argument for why you should get one.
  6. Developing ideas
    • Write up specific proposals for ideas you wish to pursue, suggests Armstrong. Generate ideas that will challenge you and emphasize the skills you want to highlight.
    • If you have ideas for how the department or company could improve, write them down as well.
  7. Evaluating salary
    • Research the typical salary in your geographical area for someone in your role. Factor in your level of experience as well. This will help with your salary negotiation.
    • Ask yourself if you’re earning what you should be, and if not, what type of pay raise you should ask for.

By conducting a review of your own performance, you’ll feel energized and inspired at performance review time. Plus, you’ll come across as far more articulate, insightful, and capable during your meeting with your boss. And in turn, you’ll make better use of that meeting, coming equipped with questions to ask and polished ideas to present.

Hire leadership coach Joel Garfinkle for more advice on preparing for career advancement.

Is Permanently Temp Work
Right for Your Career?

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“They’ve asked me to do this temporarily. I don’t know what temporarily means. Life is temporary.”

~ Bob Schieffer ~

Client Patrick Asks: Does it every make sense to just make a career out of temping? Does this make me look like I can’t hold or don’t want a “real” job—that I lack ambition?

Coach Joel Answers: That depends on your life situation and your personal motivations. For example, if you like the freedom to work when you want and pursue other interests at the same time, temping is ideal. Sometimes temping can give you a higher rate of pay, but it often lacks the benefits and job security of full time employment. You could easily work fewer hours and make more money, so that makes it attractive. And many people like the challenge of getting acquainted with new companies, new people, new responsibilities.

Here are a few more benefits to add into the equation, if you’re considering a long term career as a temp.

  1. Temping enhances your resume. It shows you have a variety of skills, as well as the ability to fit easily into different environments.
  1. Temping enhances your network. You’ll meet a lot more people, get to know them and get them to know you through working temporary assignments. Who knows when the guy in the next cubicle can open the door to a whole new career or even introduce you to your future spouse?
  1. Temping keeps your skill set sharp. You know that sign on the wall at the gym—”Use it or lose it?” The same thing applies to your professional abilities. Often you go into a new assignment wondering how in the world you’ll every figure it out. Then you do, and there’s another win you can tell future employers about.
  1. Temping can facilitate a major career change. Let’s say you’ve spent your life so far in sales but you see a brighter future in IT. Maybe you’ve taken some courses or gotten some volunteer experience, but you’ve got no track record. If you can land yourself a temporary position, even at an entry-level wage, you’ll start building toward the career you really want.

In today’s economy, temping makes a lot of sense from the employer point of view as well. According to research conducted by Forbes, 36 percent of US companies will hire contract or temporary workers this year, up from 28 percent in 2009, according to the survey of more than 3,000 hiring managers and human resource professionals. They are maintaining their productivity while reducing their risk. That presents a tremendous opportunity to someone like you. If temping feels like a good place to be, I’d say go for it.

If you think temping may have potential for you, make a list of five action items you could do this week that would get you started down the temporary path.

Talkback: Are you (or have you been) a successful temp? How did you do it? Share your best advice here.

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Tips to Save Yourself From being
Laid off or Fired From Your Job

Downsizing

“You do your best work if you do a job that makes you happy.”

~ Bob Ross ~

Client Lindsey Asks: Lately I’ve had a funny feeling at work. I’m apprehensive because I don’t think things are going well. I’m doing my job, the same as always, but I seem to be left out of the loop. I’m not invited to meetings but later I find out through the grapevine that people have made decisions that actually affect my work. Am I about to get fired? This isn’t exactly my dream job, but it’s been a good job and in this economy, I don’t want to lose it. I’m feeling very scared.

Coach Joel Answers: There are several clear signs that you’ve fallen out of favor with your boss and your job may be in jeopardy. You’ve already mentioned one of them. If you suddenly find that you’re no longer in the loop about things, that’s typically a bad sign. It’s often the first and most subtle sign that your time may be short. When you’re being kept out of decisions and new information that you normally would have been involved in, that’s a red flag. And if you’re seeing a reduction in your responsibilities, it could mean you’re being phased out.

A more obvious sign that your job is on the rocks would be overt criticism from your boss, or a poor performance review. Often companies will “build a case” for letting an employee go in order to avoid a potential wrongful termination suit. This case building typically includes documentation of performance issues, as well as written warnings and documented disciplinary actions. It may also include mentoring or coaching from your boss. This could have one of two purposes: it could either bring your performance back in line with the company’s expectations or it could serve as more documentation to support firing you.

Other obvious signs include: seeing a job posting or ad that matches your job description; being notified of a pay cut, or being moved into a position with fewer or no employees reporting directly to you.

What can you do to turn things around? What can you do to turn things around? First, decide if this is the job you really want. You mentioned that this isn’t your dream job. Would being terminated open the door to new opportunities?

If, however, you really want to hold onto this job, you need to take immediate positive action.

If you know your performance has been sub-par and you feel like you’ve fallen out of favor with your boss, talk to him or her. Explain that you’d like to make an immediate course correction and really become a valuable member of the organization. Ask what specific changes s/he would like to see and write them down. Then develop a written plan based on what your boss has said and have it on his/her desk within 48 hours.

Keep your enthusiasm high and your attitude positive. Schedule a follow-up meeting with your boss to discuss your progress. Assuming that the decision to let you go hasn’t been written in stone yet, your actions could give you a second chance to turn your situation around.

Assuming you want to stay where you are, make a list of things you like about your job. Make another list of specific tasks or areas where you think you could improve. Within the next week, schedule a meeting with your boss to work out an improvement plan.

Talkback: Have you ever been almost fired? What actions did you take to avoid it? Share your story here.

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Stuck in a rut at work?
How to Escape From Desperation Swamp

Stuck

“Most men lead lives of quiet desperation and go to the grave with the song still in them.”

~ Henry David Thoreau ~

Client Kevin Asks:  I am so stuck in a rut with my present job—it feels like walking through quicksand. I know what the next step is, the promotion to the job I want but I’m so busy doing what the current job demands that I have no time to even plan a strategy for moving ahead. How can I get out of this swamp?

Coach Joel Answers:  Unfortunately, many companies easily overlook the people who labor in silence, who do what it takes to get the job done, but never manage to get ahead. If you really want your paycheck and your job title to match your capabilities and the amount of work you do, you need to focus on creating visibility—and you need to be happy while you’re doing it. Appearances count for a lot, and you need to love the job you have while planning your next move. Here are three important steps you can take right now.

  • Love the one you’re with
  • Divide and conquer
  • Create a new model

1.    Love the one you’re with. I see you stressing out a lot because you don’t have the band-width or energy to do everything that’s on your plate right now. Before you can move ahead, you need to enjoy being where you are. Start having fun at it. A few things you can start doing today:

  • Ask for positive feedback. Don’t wait for your annual review. Look at your current projects and ask your team members or your boss for some positive input. Focus only on what’s going well.
  • Start the day on a high note. When you look at your current projects or to-do list, pick the most enjoyable item and start there. It will change the tone of your whole day by creating energy and enthusiasm.
  • List your accomplishments. Once a week, write down everything you’ve accomplished—from small things to big projects. You’ll be amazed at what you’re getting done.

2.    Divide and conquer. Even though you’re doing a great job now, what got you here won’t get you there. First, lay out all your current projects and responsibilities. Ask yourself what HAS to get done to continue your success at a base line level so you don’t create any red flags. You might have 1/3 that has to get done, 1/3 that relates to the job you want to have (visible stuff) and the other 1/3 is the stuff you might be able to get rid of, or put less time on. This will create more time and energy for new activities. Here’s the key to making delegation work: keep your name on key projects so you are getting some of the credit while not actually doing the work.

3.    Create a new model. You need to show continuously visible productivity, or put plainly, work on the things that everyone sees. Make sure you understand your boss’s priorities and make them your priorities. Volunteer for high profile projects or new company initiatives. Speak up in meetings. Be enthusiastic and make sure everyone knows you’re happy to be part of the team. Call attention to your successes while sharing plenty of credit with those around you.

Keep your eye on the prize. You already know what your next career move looks like. Keep focusing on that. Ask yourself each day, “What did I do today that fits my new model? How did I move closer to my next dream job? Before long, you’ll be exactly where you want and deserve to be.

If you’re struggling to break out of the pack and move to the next level, contact Joel today for more strategies you can use to move to the next level.

Talkback: Are you stuck in a rut? Do you have some success strategies that have helped you break free? Share your experience here.

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Are You Doing as Well as You Think You Are? How to Upgrade Your Work Performance


“Don’t lower your expectations to meet your performance. Raise your level of performance to meet your expectations. Expect the best of yourself, and then do what is necessary to make it a reality.”

~ Ralph Marston ~

Bill was a middle manager with a large financial institution. He had always felt secure in his job and felt he was making a real contribution to his department. But his last performance review was disappointing. His boss pretty much told him he’d better “kick it up a notch” if he wanted to keep his job.

Now what? Bill felt frustrated and more than a little insecure. Rather than react defensively, Bill decided on the spot to see this as an opportunity. He decided there were three steps he could take immediately to put his career back on track.

  • Ask the right questions
  • Develop a visibility plan
  • Maintain continuous course correction

Step 1: Ask the right questions. Although he was surprised and frustrated, Bill was smart enough to save the emotions for another time and place. Most bosses would probably even anticipate that Bill could be defensive and confrontational. Andy may have been prepared for an adversarial conversation. Instead, Bill used this situation to make an immediate U-turn in his career path.

Questions Bill asked:

  1. How could I have avoided this situation?
  2. Give me an example of something I could have done differently.
  3. What actions should I take now to improve my work performance?

Bill listened to Andy’s answers and took careful notes. This accomplished two things: It let Andy know that he heard him and understood his point of view and it gave Bill a head start on creating an action plan for performance improvement.

Step 2: Develop a visibility plan. Based on his conversation with Andy, Bill already had the framework in place for an action plan to improve his work performance. Rather than settling for the status quo, Bill realized that he needed to find ways to exceed (rather than just meet) Andy’s expectations. His first move was to clean up the unfinished business that Andy highlighted. Unfinished projects and unmet deadlines should always come first in a situation like this.

Once that was done, Bill volunteered to take on a department analysis project that he knew Andy and been putting off and really didn’t enjoy doing. He became more visible in staff meetings, looking for ways to step up to the plate as a problem solver and a team player. He also looked for ways to enhance his profile outside his department by attending meetings and asking questions of other leaders and managers in the company.

Step 3: Maintain continuous course correction. Bill knew that the secret to his success would come from open and positive communication with Andy. He followed up their initial meeting with a written summary that included what he heard Andy say, as well as the action steps he planned to take. He asked Andy for a weekly five-minute “How am I doing?” meeting, and scheduled a more formal review of his work performance for three months later. Needless to say, it was a good one.

Do you know the right questions to ask in your situation? If you need help developing a visibility plan and monitoring your progress to maintain course, contact Joel Garfinkle today to find out how he can help.

Talkback:

Have you had a negative performance review? Are you looking for ways to increase your visibility and move ahead in your organization? Try some of Bill’s ideas and share your story in the comments below.