Professional Development Goals for Work

“Those who improve with age embrace the power of personal growth and personal achievement and begin to replace youth with wisdom, innocence with understanding, and lack of purpose with self-actualization.”
~Bo Bennett~

Gianna had achieved some big milestones over the past year. Instead of coasting on these successes, she wanted to make a plan for building upon them. Many of her friends would make New Year’s resolutions. She didn’t want to wait til New Year’s day to set her goals. When the clock struck midnight, she would have her goals in hand, along with a roadmap of how to reach them.

Gianna asked me to help her work on setting her professional development goals, and this is the plan we came up with.

  1. Prepare to Start Fresh
    Complete the little projects you may have been procrastinating on. Tidy up your workspace so you feel clear-headed and motivated when you step into it. Have that tough conversation you’ve been avoiding—you’ll feel so much better when you’ve wrapped it up.
  2. Assess What You’ve Accomplished
    Create a log of everything you’ve achieved over the past year. Describe the measurable results of each success, so you can mentally celebrate them and share the results with others.
  3. Take Time to Reflect
    Make time to reflect on what you’ve achieved and where you’re headed. Ask yourself whether your goals and interests have changed over the past year. Does doing work you’re passionate about mean something different than it did a year ago? Ask yourself how the past year has grown your skills and knowledge, too.
  4. Set Goals for the Year
    Write down your goals for the year. Imagine yourself celebrating new victories a year from today—what do you want them to be? Make sure your goals are achievable, while also challenging you.
  5. Choose Your Priorities
    Set priorities that align with your goals. Maybe there’s a particular kind of project you want to take on, or perhaps you’re looking to take on a leadership role. Being as specific as possible, write down the priorities that will serve as stepping-stones to your goals.
  6. Determine Areas of Growth
    Ask yourself where you need to grow in order to reach your professional development goals. Work on a list of qualities you want to develop, areas of expertise you want to hone—anything that will help you get there.
  7. Make a Plan for Growth
    Consider who can support you in your journey. Make a list of people who have something to teach you in these areas, as well as other resources, like classes or leadership books.
  8. Leave Yourself Helpful Reminders
    When you come back from the holidays, having your plan somewhere handy will be a huge help. Creating a few notes to stick on your wall as reminders about your next steps will also help you maintain focus. If you plan to attend a workshop, leave yourself a reminder. Jotting down three to five main areas of growth you want to focus on and posting this note by your desk will also help you stick to the plan.
  9. Say “Thank You.”
    Thank your colleagues, bosses, and people you supervise for the things they’ve taught you over the past year. Share your gratitude with friends and family as well. Acknowledging the role of your support network will help keep it strong, and by sharing gratitude, you’ll give them support in turn.
  10. Recharge
    Give yourself time to unwind, celebrate your victories with friends and family, and enjoy hobbies that enrich your life outside of work. Take time away from all workplace communications. Allow yourself to brag a little to the people who care about you—you’ve earned it, and they’re probably excited to celebrate with you!

Having this plan in place made Gianna excited about the coming year, as well as confident in her ability to achieve her goals. When she went back to work, her goals for professional development gave her renewed enthusiasm. Like Gianna, you can enter the new year with newfound clarity, energy, and resolve by enacting the same plan.

Joel can help you craft a plan for success over the next year. Contact him for Executive Coaching Services.

Six Types of Stakeholders Leaders Need to Influence

“Leadership is not about a title or a designation. It’s about impact, influence and inspiration. Impact involves getting results, influence is about spreading the passion you have for your work, and you have to inspire team-mates and customers.” ~Robin S. Sharma~

Jackie had just accepted a promotion and was working to develop a grasp of whom she needed to influence in her organization. She knew that influencing stakeholders, both internal and external, is critical to any leader’s success, and that building strong working relationships strengthens influence. Her mentor helped her to map out the key people she needed to influence at this stage in her career, and this is what they came up with.

  1. Executives
    Influencing executives helps a leader to build broad support for her projects and ideas and to gain financial backing when necessary. When a leader sells her ideas to executives, they in turn influence shareholders and directors, as they typically have closer contact with them. Therefore, by influencing an executive, a leader influences others who are high on the organizational hierarchy. Plus, these executives often have direct influence over promotions, so gaining influence with them is critical to career advancement. Learning to think like executives, understand their vision, and articulate ideas with confidence are key aspects of gaining influence with them.
  2. Clients
    When a leader has influence with clients, they trust her ideas and advice. They’re more likely to support taking calculated risks and trying new ideas that the leader supports. Reliability is a key factor in gaining influence with clients. Building a strong rapport with them is another. Strong relationships allow a client to understand how a leader thinks and what she cares about, building a bond of trust. These relationships also allow leaders to gain input from customers that lets them better serve their needs.
  3. Sales departments
    It’s important for leaders to influence their sales departments so these departments truly have confidence in their company’s products or services. When the sales department believes in what the company is doing, it will convey that enthusiasm to customers or clients. Leaders need to make sure sales departments are thoroughly educated about products and services as well as their value. This knowledge will help them convey a sense of confidence to customers and clients.
  4. Finance departments
    Finance departments are another group of stakeholders that leaders must influence in order to gain their trust as well. This trust allows them to work as partners to allocate financial support to projects. Leaders must show the finance department that their projects are good investments for the company. Additionally, they should thoroughly educate them in the rationale for pursuing particular projects, so finance personnel can articulate it to others in the company, further building buy-in.
  5. Other colleagues
    All colleagues in the workplace are stakeholders that a leader needs to influence. Building strong relationships throughout the workplace will help a leader gain buy-in for projects and ideas. Further, it will prime him to move into a more advanced leadership position, because the people he’ll be supervising already have a high level of respect for him.
  6. Suppliers and contractors
    Leaders must build strong relationships with suppliers and contractors as well. They’ll gain more leverage with these parties as they convince them that the company’s endeavors will prove lucrative far into the future. These parties want to build relationships with companies that will continue reaching higher levels of success, meaning they can grow together. When leaders convinces suppliers and contractors that the company’s growth will continue, they’ll have more room to negotiate with them as well as a stable base of support.

As Jackie worked on influencing these key stakeholders, she found herself becoming more respected as a leader in her company. At first, she had to make a conscious effort to think about how to approach these stakeholders on a daily basis, but after a while, it began coming naturally. Often a colleague would reach out to her to discuss a company project or new idea, so she was no longer doing all the legwork in building these relationships. As her influence grew, people began coming to her more often, and she did her part to maintain strong ongoing relationships with them all.

Joel’s leadership coaching will help you reach the key stakeholders in your organization. He’s an expert on how company’s leaders can use their influence with key stakeholders.

Have you found it especially easy or challenging to gain influence with any particular groups of stakeholders? Share your experiences here.

Number #1 Factor for Career Success: Increased visibility in Your Job

“The power of visibility can never be underestimated.” ~Margaret Cho~

Zachary Asks: You’ve seen a lot of people climb the ladder of success. And probably some fall back down it. In all that time, what’s the one thing people should know… but probably don’t… that would have the greatest impact on their career?

Joel Answers: Great question Zachary. We’ve been programmed that those who work hardest get ahead. But we look around and see that isn’t necessary so. We’ve also been told to dress for success, to be a team player, to communicate well, and to network.

All these things are important. They are an essential foundation to produce success. But you can do all these things and still feel you have somehow missed the growth trajectory you expected.

In my opinion, the real key that takes your strengths of hard work, communication, and all the others and propels you to success is one overriding skill: increasing your job visibility at work.

Wait! Don’t tell me, “Oh, everyone knows who I am.” It’s really more strategic than that.

If you fail to make yourself recognized at work, you run the risk that your peers and management may not actually know your impact. They may be clueless about what work you’re doing or the impact you are having on the company.

If they don’t see the overall value you bring to the organization not only might you not be promoted, you could be one of the first let go. Gaining job visibility is vital to career success at work.

Three Steps to Greater Visibility

  1. How does Your Work Bring Value to the Company? For some this is an easy question. They develop a product and the sales bring in revenue. But in middle management, sometimes there are more steps between your work and the bottom line of the company.

    It’s helpful to chart that out. Look at each thing you do and connect the dots to the company’s profitability.

  2. Can Your Coworkers Identify This Value? Coworkers can be a strong advocate in raising your visibility. They can praise your work to others or share your memos that tell what you are working on and why it’s vital.

    One way to increase your own visibility is to share the successes of others. “Our team worked overtime to get this report ready to present by the meeting. They really pitched in.” By implication, others will know you also pitched in and worked hard.

  3. Does Your Boss Know What You’re Doing? A key to success is making sure the management knows of your work, your projects, and your successes. You can do this as you:
    • Schedule review meetings with him
    • Send weekly updates on your projects
    • Bring him or her into the loop by consulting on thorny problems
    • Speak up at meetings with thoughtful questions and good solutions
    • Look for your remarkable achievements and share them- tell your story
    • Share what makes you unique so you stand out at work

Be aware of the ways you use to gain visibility. Your job is to check the outcome to see if they are getting the results you want. Are people aware of you and talking about your work? Are they giving you the highly visible jobs? In your annual review, is your boss commenting on some of the outstanding projects you’ve done?

Once you master the key to increasing your visibility at work, you will see your career move forward at an accelerated pace.

Are you looking to gain visibility in your job? Is it hard for you to come out of the shadows? Evaluate your visibility so you can learn how to become known for your actual impact at work.

Have you struggled to increase your visibility at work? What ways have you found to be most successful?

3 Keys to Climbing the Corporate Ladder

“If you’re climbing the ladder of life, you go rung by rung, one step at a time. Don’t look too far up. Set your goals high but take one step at a time. Sometimes you don’t think you are progressing until you step back and see how high you’ve really gone.” ~ Donny Osmond ~

Katherine Asks: Your book, Getting Ahead – Three Steps to take your career to the next level focuses on the three key factors that will propel people up the career ladder – improving perception, increasing visibility and exerting influence. Why should I focus on these three steps? Won’t my work/professionalism speak for itself?

Joel Answers: Katherine, I wish it was that easy. The truth is that how quickly and successfully you climb the corporate ladder depends on far more than just your excellent work. Advancement is based on the perception you create, not just the merit you have accumulated or the skill level you have achieved.

For example, one person I coached was a senior business development manager who worked for Cisco Systems for 11 years. He came to me for coaching because he wasn’t advancing in the company as quickly as he wanted to. Even though he had solid performance reviews and excellent job skills, he had gone four years without a promotion.

Like you, Katherine, this man thought that his work should speak for itself. He believed if he just worked hard and did a good job, people would notice him. But it didn’t work that way.

Because he didn’t let management know how valuable he was to the organization, they overlooked him. Think back to when you were in school. Didn’t the teacher recognize the person with the raised hand? While others flew under the radar?

The PVI model provides the art of getting ahead. It gives you simple steps to “raise your hand.” They help you improve your perception, increase your visibility and exert influence. When you do these things, you get noticed… and get advanced.

  • Improve Perception. You can help others have a more positive view of you. Simple steps can change their perception. Speak up. Take the lead. Praise others. Let management know how your work benefits the company. Help others see you as a leader, a team player, a hard-working problem solver.
  • Increase Visibility. How many people know what you do? When others are aware of your value, they can help you in climbing the corporate ladder. You might take on a project no-one wants or a high-profile project.

    You can interact with people outside your immediate organization and make ways to inform your boss… and even your boss’s boss about the important things you are working on.
  • Exert Influence. The surprising thing is that you don’t need any kind of title or authority to have influence. Your character and the way co-workers perceive you can build the trust and respect needed so they listen to your comments and value them.

    As you are known for getting things done, building alliances, and gaining buy-in for your ideas, you begin to be the kind of person people rely on. You can sway decisions. Others want to follow you. Then it only makes sense to promote you to a position that uses these qualities.

Katherine, doing a great job is the foundation that the PVI model builds on. It can’t work if the person does poor quality work. But once you have that foundation, using perception, visibility and influence helps you rise to the top, stand out, and get promoted.

Buy Getting Ahead and learn how the PVI model can help you. Contract Joel for executive coaching so he can personally help you in climbing the corporate ladder.

What did you do this week to move up the corporate ladder?

3 Major Factors Affecting Employee Productivity and Overall Impact

Nothing is less productive than to make more efficient what should not be done at all. ~ Peter Drucker ~

Kevin had been hired to turn the company around. He arrived to find a sluggish, apathetic staff. Most were warry of the change and unwilling to stick their neck out for anything.

Kevin moved immediately to work on the three things that would most affect your employee’s productivity. He knew he had to energize the workforce. He had to learn who could rise to the top and which employees are worth letting go.

The PVI Model— Perception, Visibility, Influence— seemed designed to empower employees to take back control of their careers. Keven felt sure once they saw the impact they could have in influencing those around them, they would become energized and increase productivity.

  1. Perception. Kevin started educating his workforce on both how he perceived them and what he knew they were capable of. He encouraged them to look within themselves for their strengths and talents.

    “Sharing what you know and can do is not bragging,” he said. “It helps us use your strengths in key places. You can enjoy your work more and we can produce more when we match your strengths to our needs.”

    Kevin was quick to value employees who spent the time looking at how they were perceived and then acted in a way to increase positive responses.

  2. Visibility. Sometimes it was hard to see who really had the greatest talents. It wasn’t just those who talked about it the most. But it was essential for Kevin to find the rising stars. So he deliberately cultivated a culture of people willing to increase their visibility.

    Workers sent in a weekly report of their accomplishments. They created a large “brag board” for employees to pin “atta-boys” for themselves and co-workers. They took a few minutes at meetings for attendees to tell their greatest accomplishment of the week.

    Soon, Kevin had a firm grasp of those employees who were contributing to productivity.

  3. Influence. Kevin saw the influence of the more confident employees rub off on the apathetic ones. He encouraged team work and mentoring. Open discussions allowed employees to influence decisions made at higher levels.

    As the workers saw their increasing influence, they began to feel empowered. Kevin felt the energy increasing week by week. Workers took more responsibility for themselves and their projects.

    Friendly competition and rivalry made each team seek to do their best. Kevin cross- pollinated the teams so the best influencers could enrich weaker teams.

“The pay-off for the organization was huge,” Kevin said. “This PVI Model had a major effect on the employee’s productivity, motivation, and staff retention. After just a few months, it feels like a completely different company.”

Kevin commented on the tone, the buzz of the office. Workers came up and thanked him for making such a difference. “They even told me they’d recommended their friends come work here.” Kevin said. “That’s such a contrast to the brain drain I faced when I arrived.”

“Perception, visibility and influence just make the company run better— on every level,” he concluded.

If your company needs to increase productivity and your employees motivation, Contract Joel for executive coaching. You can buy Getting Ahead to learn more about the PVI Model.

What parts of your company culture affect your productivity? What makes your employees most productive?