Training and Developing Employees

Your Hidden Language: Training Employees to Develop Positive Body Language

Body Language

“The human body is the best picture of the human soul.”

~ Ludwig Wittgenstein ~

Conflict among staff can occur because of the things we say or how we act.  It can also occur when our body language communicates things we might not be aware of.  To increase harmony in the office, consider training employees to develop a recognition of the importance of body language and give them skills to master it.

When we listen to people, we also read their body language to see if it is in sync with their words. Most people recognize the body language that says: I’m interested, I’m not interested, I’m busy, please listen to me.

But some people are less aware of body language. When they ignore these messages or misread them, tension and irritation occurs.  Training employees to develop awareness of other people’s body language and the unspoken messages they send can create more trust and harmony in the work place.  It’s worth the effort.

 1. Give Voice to Body Language. If you find that meetings are disrupted by annoying fidgeting or conversations are distracted by the listener staring off into space, it may be time to talk about and train your staff on this topic.  Consider role playing to show the messages sent so even the less sensitive workers recognize the language of the body.  Video tape staff speaking or listening so they can see their own body language.

Often people are highly critical when they see themselves on screen. Balance their views with supportive staff who point out the messages they see in their coworker’s body language.  When body language is addressed head on and out in the open, employees develop more sensitivity to their physical actions as well as being in tune with others.

2. Body language that shows more than you want.   The key effectiveness of body language is that it helps others discern a person’s true feelings.  While you might think you are talking pleasantly to someone you’re angry with, your body language will tell a different story.  Help employees develop coping strategies.

  • Check your emotions. Before you talk with a person or enter a meeting, evaluate how you feel about the people you will see.  If you feel angry, frustrated, or condescending toward anyone there, watch out!  Be very careful your body is not exhibiting your emotions.
  • Be honest.  The easiest way to gain great body language is to have good emotions and communication skills.  If you are interested, if you are paying attention, if you are respectful to your co workers, your body will automatically broadcast those emotions.

3. Body Language that lies. As you train and develop your employees, help them recognize the internal and external reasons body language may not represent the “truth.”

  • If a person is hungry or needs to relieve him or herself, the stresses of the body will be reflected in actions.  The fidgeting, hunching the body, or glancing at the clock might be misinterpreted as disinterest, when the causes are biological.  Help your employees avoid sending these incorrect messages by planning ahead and not going into meetings or events hungry or stressed.  A chilly room may cause crossed arms.
  • Illness—either temporary or long-running can affect our body language. Help employees be aware of others who have ADHD or Tourette’s or any of a host of other medical problems that may cause them to act differently.

Offices run smoother when conflicts are kept to a minimum through understanding and respect.  One effective way to make this happen is through training employees to be aware of their own body language and to not misunderstand the body language of those around them.

Contact Joel to find out more about training and developing employees. 

Talkback: What annoying body language have you faced?  Was there ever a time when you thought you understood someone’s body language and discovered you were mistaken?

Image courtesy of Auremar / Fotolia.com

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