Management Succession Planning

Management Succession Planning
with Personality Assessments

Untitled

 

“In the end, all business operations can be reduced to three words: people, product and profits. Unless you’ve got a good team, you can’t do much with the other two.”

~Lee Iacocca~

Fidel was assigned to manage the succession planning in his company. Little had been done and he needed to identify key management positions and ideal replacement personnel within the ranks.

In the past he’d seen people promoted who didn’t succeed even though they had the proper training and skill sets.  Fidel felt there was a key missing ingredient.

He turned to personality assessments. He looked at Myers-Briggs, the Color Code, Fascination, and other methods to understand the way personality influenced success.

Fidel understood that personality type was only part of the equation in management succession planning, but it was still important.  “The company needs all of the personality types to function optimally,” Fidel said. “I realized part of my job was to create an atmosphere of respect for each personality type, so they felt free to bring their strengths to the table.”

  • Detail oriented personalities. Some people naturally attend to the details.  They make sure the reports are done on time, they meet deadlines, and assist others at being responsible and timely.  “I looked at the jobs that required this kind of close attention to detail,” Fidel said. “Then I made sure the person we put in our succession planning program had those qualities.”
  • Team building personalities. “There are some people that are natural team builders,” Fidel said.  They are good at creating enthusiasm, gathering consensus, and helping the team get along.  Fidel made sure these personality types were matched with the jobs that especially needed that group leadership.  He recognized, however, that this personality type would not excel at the detailed follow-through that might be needed.
  • Analyzing and processing personalities. Some people naturally follow critical thinking skills.  They work well in positions that require analyzing information.  They are gifted in sorting through massive information and understanding that it means and how to use it to their advantage.
  • Think-outside-the box personalities. These intuitive thinkers are great for getting projects started. They are creative, inventive and vital for brainstorming.  Fidel understood they should not be placed in management succession for a position calling for analyzing and processing.  They would serve the company best in places where their creative thinking was welcomed and essential. 
  • The excellent personality.  Some people just want the best—for themselves and their company.  Excellent is barely good enough. They are effective at driving others to be the best.  Fidel wanted this personality for succession planning for top talent that encourages the company forward. 
  • Nurturing personalities.  When people know others care for them they respond better and perform better.  They can be more effective sales people.  They can see a need and fill it.  In difficult situations, the nurturing personality can keep things running smoothly.  Fidel assessed the key jobs that needed someone who could be supportive under pressure.  Then he evaluated potential successors for these attributes. 

“People looked at me a little strangely, when I first required them to take these personality assessments,” Fidel said. “I even got a little push back from HR when I incorporated personality types into the management succession planning.  But it’s worked out beautifully.”

In the three instances where Fidel’s chosen successor moved into the new job, they have performed exceptionally well.  “I feel vindicated,” Fidel said.  “It’s doing everything I hoped it would.” 

Do you have concerns about your company’s management succession planning? Contact Joel and he can help you with this and other options to insure you have key players in place when you need them.

Talkback: How does your company work its succession planning?  What are key factors to consider?

Image courtesy of Blog.llb / Blog.llb

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