Executive Job Training

Finding Free Executive Job Training

professional development training

 “The best way to predict your future is to create it”

~ Peter F. Drucker ~

Samantha was ready to move up. But she was pretty much at a dead end at her current job.  She knew she needed more executive job training before she’d be ready for a profitable transition to another company, but as a single mom, she couldn’t afford to pay for it.  Her current job wouldn’t cover it. The executive training had to be free.

“I knew I needed to think and act like an executive before I’d ever have the chance to be in that position,” Samantha said. “I was close.  But not there yet.  I came up with 4 free sources for executive job training.”

1. Observation.  “It cost me nothing to observe other leaders,” Samantha said.  “I looked for executives within my current company—ones I liked and admired.”  She made a conscious effort to watch their management style.   She took notes on how they presented ideas, how they listened to responses, and interacted with team members.  “I not only listened to what they said, I watched how they acted, how they moved.”  She paid attention to details.  “I even listened to their voice inflection and watched other’s reactions.”

2. Books. Samantha started with the free books at the public library.  Those books she found especially valuable she bought so she could underline them, cross reference, and add them to her library. “There are a lot of books on job training and executive leadership,” Samantha said. “And they vary widely in quality.”  Samantha spent some time on Amazon and other sources reading the reviews.  While they were not always accurate, she found them generally helpful in choosing the best books for her.

3. Online Sources. While the quality also varies with web sources, Samantha found plenty of free executive job training there.  Some sites offered free white papers on different aspects of leadership.  She found blogs, articles, websites and business leadership books that delivered meaningful content. “I downloaded every piece of free training I could find,” Samantha said. “Some coaches and trainers are very generous with their information.  It was like getting an MBA.”

4. Study Leaders. “I decided that my leadership style was like Meg Whitman’s—or I wanted it to be like hers,” Samantha said.  She felt her personality traits and the way she liked to lead dovetailed into the way Meg was currently leading.  So she did an in-depth study of Meg. “I watched her on YouTube.  I read every article I could find on her.  Then I “put on” her leadership style.  I stepped up to a more direct approach.  I realized I can be pleasant and still be insightful, deliberate, and exacting.”

Samantha was surprised at how completely her free executive job training paid off! “First co-workers started coming to me for advice and problem solving.  Then the management actually created a new position and moved me into it.”  Samantha realized that executive training requires work and application whether the training is free or paid.

But in this case, Samantha’s efforts paid off very well.

If you are looking for free training for your executive goals, be sure to visit Joel’s website and access the leadership articles and information there.

Talkback: Have you find great free sources for executive job training?  Tell us about them.

Image courtesy of marinini / Fotolia.com

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