Executive Coach Training

How Can I get the Skills I Learn from Executive Coaching to Stick? How can I get that training to actually become part of me?

skills poster

“Leadership is the art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it”

~ Dwight D. Eisenhower ~

Q:  Jamie asks:  I read lots of material on how to improve in organization, skill level, and leadership.  I work at it for a few days.  Then I find myself going back to my old way of doing things.  How can I actually change myself permanently?

A:  Coach Joel Answers: You ask a great question, Jamie. This is the secret to success in all walks of life:  Knowing how to take information and apply it in your life.

One technique is to take your Executive Coaching and train like an athlete. Athletes take their training seriously.  As you think of yourself as an “Executive Athlete,” you may be motivated to stick to your plan.

1. Think about it daily. Athletes make training a priority.  They think about it and plan time to practice their skill every day.  Calendar your training.  What can you do today to exercise your skills and train you to build the habits you want?

2. Make a commitment to train. You already know what you need to do.  This is a great step forward.  You have the desire to change.  That, too, is a valuable piece of the pie.  Now you need to make the decision to train every day.   Like an athlete, you will start small.

Too often, athletes… and executives… find a great skill and think they can master it immediately.  They train so vigorously for a few days that they are exhausted by the effort and stop training.

Instead, start at a deliberate, achievable pace.  Master one trait and then go on to the next.

3. Hire the best executive coach and follow his training plan.  Athletes don’t try to go it alone.  Most often great athletes work under skilled coaches.  You will find you progress more successfully when you have a coach at your side to help with your training.

An executive coach will keep you on track and make sure you take logical, necessary, and most meaningful steps.  They will cheer your progress.

4. Measure your success and improvement. Every great athlete has goals to reach.  They measure their progress toward those goals in milliseconds.  Measure and celebrate every increment of change you see in yourself.

Set benchmarks and standards.  Evaluate your improvement daily, weekly, and monthly. Soon you will see your habits of leadership developing.

5. Challenge yourself to do better.  Only you know if your pace is too easy or strenuous. Challenge yourself to become the best executive you can. Use coaching and training to help you reach this goal.  Don’t settle for okay.  Reach for the best you can be.

6. Take a set-back, learn from it, and move forward.  Know there will be setbacks.  Athletes get sick or injured and have to regroup and start training again.  There will be days you slip.  Don’t let one failure stop your training.  Get back up, give yourself a break for the moment, and get started again.

7. Reward yourself.  You may not earn an Olympic metal, but you can still reward yourself for your success in executive training.  You’ve followed your coach. You’ve seen success.  Celebrate!

When you take the challenge to change your habits, you’ve started on a new venture.  With executive coach training, you join the ranks of professional athletes. You establish goals, training methods, and measure your successes.  The end results are habits of leadership that will benefit you and your organization.

To jumpstart your executive coaching and become the executive athlete you want to be, contact Joel.

Talkback: What methods have you used to change knowledge into habits? Let me know.

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One Response to How Can I get the Skills I Learn from Executive Coaching to Stick? How can I get that training to actually become part of me?

  1. Joel, I’ve seen many people struggle with this. In fact, I struggle getting new knowledge to stick with me.

    One way I’ve discovered works is to immediately begin implementing what I’ve learned and keeping at it. If you can’t afford a coach, find someone who will hold you accountable to continually using what you’ve learned.

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