Are you Afraid to Speak Up at Meetings
When you Have Good Ideas?


“The most courageous act is still to think for yourself. Aloud.”

~ Coco Chanel ~

Casey is facing a dilemma. She has always considered herself a leader. And she’s always been considered a leader by others. At work, she consistently brings out the best in her people by encouraging them, listening to them, empowering them, and letting them know they are important and that their opinions matter.

Lately, however, Casey has become The Reluctant Leader. She feels she is not being noticed for all her hard work and accomplishments. Yet she doesn’t feel comfortable bragging, talking about how great she is, or publicly calling attention to all her accomplishments. 

In recent meetings and encounters with her boss and other C-level employees, she is consciously choosing not to speak up when she knows she should. She wonders if she’s just come down with a temporary case of shyness, or if this has the potential to become a real problem. In discussing it with me, Casey lists these reasons for her reluctance:

  • I’m afraid of stepping on peoples’ toes
  • I feel like people know my strengths and they should ask for my input
  • Sometimes I feel like punishing people for not listening to me by letting them struggle and find the answers on their own
  • I even think sometimes that I have the wrong answer and don’t want to embarrass myself by speaking up.

As Casey’s coach, I concluded that she had probably become a bit too comfortable in her comfort zone. Sometimes it’s easy to figure that “once a leader, always a leader,” so you quit trying to raise your visibility with the bosses. I offered Casey this checklist of ideas to jump start the raising of her profile.

  1. Volunteer for a high visibility project. Look for something that has serious consequences at the senior management level, or that has been perceived to be challenging or risky by others. Focus on something with real results, including bottom line impact.
  1. Find cross – departmental opportunities that will expand both your horizons and your visibility. If you work in accounting, look for a project in sales, marketing, or communications. If you work in sales, look for ways to get a thorough understanding of the support functions in the company. It will make you a better sales manager and your superiors will notice your initiative.
  1. If you have a bright idea or an answer to some recurring problem, look for the right occasion to speak up, preferably in a meeting where top brass are present. Volunteer to make it happen too—don’t just leave it on the table.

Don’t wait until you feel comfortable to start changing your approach. Nobody’s perfect, and even if you implement all these action items, you’ll make mistakes along the way. Don’t let that discourage you. Just dust yourself off and keep talking.

Casey implemented all these ideas over the next month, and found that her reluctance to speak up all but disappeared and she was once again the leader she thought herself to be. 

Make a list of where and how you could implement each of these ideas. Then start implementing them this week.

Talkback: Have you successfully raised your visibility at work? What ideas worked for you? Share your experience here.

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Share Your Achievements to Get Recognition at Work

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“It is important that you recognize your progress and take pride in your accomplishments. Share your achievements with others. Brag a little. The recognition and support of those around you is nurturing.”

~ Rosemarie Rossetti ~

Client Matt Asks: I never seem to get the recognition I deserve for my work, but I’m afraid to say anything because it might seem like I’m bragging. Is it appropriate to mention my accomplishments to others at work?

Coach Joel Answers: You know you’re good at what you do and deserve to get more recognition, increased responsibility and a probably even a promotion. But does anyone else know?

Many employees are passed by or completely overlooked simply because senior management doesn’t know how valuable they are.

In a Newsweek article, Sharon Allen, Chairman of the board, Deloitte &Touche USA, said: “Take responsibility for your own career. Don’t assume that others are aware of the good work you’re doing. When I was a young accountant, I was unhappy about not getting a promotion. I went to my supervisor and told him all of these things that I thought I should be given credit for and he said, ‘Well, gee, I didn’t know that you had done all of these things.’ It was a real wakeup call. You don’t have to be a bragger, but I think it’s very important that we make people aware of our accomplishments…”

Your accomplishments are the currency you use to calculate your value to the company. When tracking accomplishments, focus on:

  • Business results.
  • The value you’ve provided to the company.
  • Fact-based, concrete details.
  • The specific feedback you receive from others.
  • Quantifiable data is especially persuasive because it measures the impact of your accomplishments.

Not only does tracking your accomplishments create concrete examples of your value, the tracking process itself will give you confidence. As you become aware of your progress, you will be more comfortable telling others, in specific terms, how you provide value to the company.

Like Ms. Allen says, you don’t have to be a bragger. Take advantage of opportunities to communicate your accomplishments. If others don’t hear about them from you, they can only operate from perception and second-hand information.

If you’re unsure about how much self-promotion is too much, Joel’s coaching program will provide you with a customized action plan to help you leapfrog your way to the top of the career ladder. Click here for more information.

Talkback: Do you get the recognition you deserve at work? What can you do to ensure that you get credit for your accomplishments?

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7 Steps – How to Ask for a Job Promotion

Promotion Tips

“You were hired because you met expectations; you will be promoted if you can exceed them.”

~ Saji Ijiyemi ~

Denise has been a team leader for an IT company for the past year. Now she wants to move up.

“I had my eye on the manager’s position.  I knew he was thinking about relocating to be near his sick dad,” Denise said. “I wanted that job, but I wanted to make sure I knew how to ask for the job promotion the right way.

Denise stepped back a little so she’d have the greatest chance of success.

1. Evaluate Yourself: “I stopped to evaluate how well I was doing as a team leader,” Denise said.  She looked at her past reviews to see if she’d made the improvements suggested and met the company goals for her. Had she given value to the company?

2. Observe the Job You Want:  Then she started looking more carefully at the manager’s job.  What exactly did he do? “I saw he had much more responsibility moving the project to completion,” Denise said.  “I started looking at all the factors that led to this—how he scheduled meetings, how he interacted with the team leaders. I looked at the paperwork he processed and the hours he kept.”

3. Act the Part:  “Then, to the best I could, I tried on the job,” Denise said.  “I put in the hours he did.  I tried to connect with my team and motivate them in an effective way to help our numbers improve.”  To her best ability—without stepping on anyone’s toes—Denise acted the part of the manager.  She volunteered to take on some of his responsibilities.

4. Prepare your Benefits:  Now Denise needed to prepare her presentation.  She gathered the data that showed her value to the company.  She listed the successes of her team.  She got feedback on her performance from peers, subordinates, and bosses. “If I was going to ask for the job promotion, I needed to be prepared,” Denise said.

“I went one step further,” Denise said. “I wanted to be sure I asked for a competitive pay rate, if I got the job. So I researched to see the range of salary I might expect.”

5. Set up the meeting: Denise didn’t want to just walk into her boss to discuss the promotion.  She asked for a meeting.  She wanted his undivided attention.  She knew he was grumpy before his second cup of coffee, so she tried to schedule it later in the morning. “I told him I wanted to discuss my performance and benefit to the company,” Denise said.

6. Sell Yourself:  You are not there to beg for a job promotion.  Your job is to convince your boss, the company will get so much value for you they will want to offer you the job promotion.

Have your facts and figures lined up.  “I have a hard time tooting my own horn,” Denise said. “So I really tried to have everything laid out visually so the work would speak for itself.”

7. Back-up Plan:  For Denise, her plan worked and she got the promotion. But she had a back-up plan. “I decided if they said no, I’d ask what I needed to do to be qualified for that promotion or another one,” Denise said. “What was holding me back, and what skills or abilities did I need to have so the next time I came and asked, I’d be successful.”

Like Denise, once you know how to ask for a job promotion, you can start taking the steps to that next job.  Be confident your skills and abilities match the job you want.  Then go in and ask for that promotion.

Call to Action:  If you want that new promotion, but need a coach to walk you through these steps to insure you’re totally qualified, contact Joel.

Talkback: Have you asked for a job promotion?  What things helped you the most?

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Stuck in a rut at work?
How to Escape From Desperation Swamp


“Most men lead lives of quiet desperation and go to the grave with the song still in them.”

~ Henry David Thoreau ~

Client Kevin Asks:  I am so stuck in a rut with my present job—it feels like walking through quicksand. I know what the next step is, the promotion to the job I want but I’m so busy doing what the current job demands that I have no time to even plan a strategy for moving ahead. How can I get out of this swamp?

Coach Joel Answers:  Unfortunately, many companies easily overlook the people who labor in silence, who do what it takes to get the job done, but never manage to get ahead. If you really want your paycheck and your job title to match your capabilities and the amount of work you do, you need to focus on creating visibility—and you need to be happy while you’re doing it. Appearances count for a lot, and you need to love the job you have while planning your next move. Here are three important steps you can take right now.

  • Love the one you’re with
  • Divide and conquer
  • Create a new model

1.    Love the one you’re with. I see you stressing out a lot because you don’t have the band-width or energy to do everything that’s on your plate right now. Before you can move ahead, you need to enjoy being where you are. Start having fun at it. A few things you can start doing today:

  • Ask for positive feedback. Don’t wait for your annual review. Look at your current projects and ask your team members or your boss for some positive input. Focus only on what’s going well.
  • Start the day on a high note. When you look at your current projects or to-do list, pick the most enjoyable item and start there. It will change the tone of your whole day by creating energy and enthusiasm.
  • List your accomplishments. Once a week, write down everything you’ve accomplished—from small things to big projects. You’ll be amazed at what you’re getting done.

2.    Divide and conquer. Even though you’re doing a great job now, what got you here won’t get you there. First, lay out all your current projects and responsibilities. Ask yourself what HAS to get done to continue your success at a base line level so you don’t create any red flags. You might have 1/3 that has to get done, 1/3 that relates to the job you want to have (visible stuff) and the other 1/3 is the stuff you might be able to get rid of, or put less time on. This will create more time and energy for new activities. Here’s the key to making delegation work: keep your name on key projects so you are getting some of the credit while not actually doing the work.

3.    Create a new model. You need to show continuously visible productivity, or put plainly, work on the things that everyone sees. Make sure you understand your boss’s priorities and make them your priorities. Volunteer for high profile projects or new company initiatives. Speak up in meetings. Be enthusiastic and make sure everyone knows you’re happy to be part of the team. Call attention to your successes while sharing plenty of credit with those around you.

Keep your eye on the prize. You already know what your next career move looks like. Keep focusing on that. Ask yourself each day, “What did I do today that fits my new model? How did I move closer to my next dream job? Before long, you’ll be exactly where you want and deserve to be.

If you’re struggling to break out of the pack and move to the next level, contact Joel today for more strategies you can use to move to the next level.

Talkback: Are you stuck in a rut? Do you have some success strategies that have helped you break free? Share your experience here.

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How To Shine When the Competition Gets Tough

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“Nobody’s a natural. You work hard to get good and then work to get better.”

~ Paul Coffey ~

You’ve always been a star worker—respected by your peers and looked up to by your employees. Using your quick wits and technical skills, rising up the ranks was smooth sailing until you moved to a larger firm.

You took on the responsibility with zeal and excitement, awaiting the same recognition and esteem only to find that you’re now surrounded by other star workers, each with their own unique skill sets and talents, and you find it hard to stand out from your peers.

The star status that seemed effortless at one time seems to be getting harder and harder to achieve with the tougher competition. You strive to get noticed as you see others shining in the limelight of success.

If you identify with the above, you’re not alone. As an executive coach, I see this happen all the time. Clients come to me feeling confused about how they should tackle this difficult adjustment and what steps they should take to up their game.

If you’re in the same boat and want some immediate answers, my recent guest post for will tell you how to stand out from the talent around you. You must have done something right to get to where you are; keep your confidence high, and with the right know-how you’ll shine again.

If you need a little help getting your star to shine again, executive coaching career coach Joel Garfinkle can help. Contact Joel today to reach your full potential through his executive coaching services.

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