Share Your Achievements to Get Recognition at Work

Man with megaphone

“It is important that you recognize your progress and take pride in your accomplishments. Share your achievements with others. Brag a little. The recognition and support of those around you is nurturing.”

~ Rosemarie Rossetti ~

Client Matt Asks: I never seem to get the recognition I deserve for my work, but I’m afraid to say anything because it might seem like I’m bragging. Is it appropriate to mention my accomplishments to others at work?

Coach Joel Answers: You know you’re good at what you do and deserve to get more recognition, increased responsibility and a probably even a promotion. But does anyone else know?

Many employees are passed by or completely overlooked simply because senior management doesn’t know how valuable they are.

In a Newsweek article, Sharon Allen, Chairman of the board, Deloitte &Touche USA, said: “Take responsibility for your own career. Don’t assume that others are aware of the good work you’re doing. When I was a young accountant, I was unhappy about not getting a promotion. I went to my supervisor and told him all of these things that I thought I should be given credit for and he said, ‘Well, gee, I didn’t know that you had done all of these things.’ It was a real wakeup call. You don’t have to be a bragger, but I think it’s very important that we make people aware of our accomplishments…”

Your accomplishments are the currency you use to calculate your value to the company. When tracking accomplishments, focus on:

  • Business results.
  • The value you’ve provided to the company.
  • Fact-based, concrete details.
  • The specific feedback you receive from others.
  • Quantifiable data is especially persuasive because it measures the impact of your accomplishments.

Not only does tracking your accomplishments create concrete examples of your value, the tracking process itself will give you confidence. As you become aware of your progress, you will be more comfortable telling others, in specific terms, how you provide value to the company.

Like Ms. Allen says, you don’t have to be a bragger. Take advantage of opportunities to communicate your accomplishments. If others don’t hear about them from you, they can only operate from perception and second-hand information.

If you’re unsure about how much self-promotion is too much, Joel’s coaching program will provide you with a customized action plan to help you leapfrog your way to the top of the career ladder. Click here for more information.

Talkback: Do you get the recognition you deserve at work? What can you do to ensure that you get credit for your accomplishments?

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Want to Improve Your Chances of
Being Promoted by 80 Percent?

Financial adviser or business mentor help team partner up to pro

“Successful people turn everyone who can help them into sometime mentors.”

~ John Crosby ~

Virginia is hoping to be promoted soon. She approached me to find out what she can do to increase her chances of getting the position she desires.

As I told Virginia, there is one thing you can do that is so important, you are practically shooting yourself in the foot if you don’t do it.

Studies have shown that a mentoring relationship with an influential individual can increase your chances of being promoted by more than 80 percent. So if you don’t have a mentor, it’s time to get one now.

A mentor can help you understand the culture and inner workings of the organization. He or she can work with you to create career plans, improve areas of weakness, provide honest feedback and introduce you to other supportive people.

Katherine Klein, a Wharton management professor, says that mentoring is “a sounding board and a place where it’s safe to be vulnerable and get career advice. It’s a relationship where one can let one’s guard down, a place where one can get honest feedback, and a place, ideally, where one can get psychological and social support in handling stressful situations.”

Klein adds, “Mentors also should have an understanding of the organization’s values, culture and norms so they can pass these along to mentees. The mentor should be sensitive to the mentee’s needs and wishes, and enhance the mentee’s career potential, while simultaneously looking for ways the mentee’s potential can benefit the organization.”

Often, when initiating the mentoring relationship, you may feel like you are invading your mentor’s space and time. You may be hesitant to reach out and ask for help. However, the mentor also gains from the relationship; says Klein “You get the satisfaction of seeing somebody develop. And don’t forget that mentees may be in a position to help the mentor at some point.

“Mentees may also make the mentor look good.” Terri Scandura, a management professor and dean of the graduate school of the University of Miami, says, “Dealing with a person who is your junior improves your network. Mentors know more about what goes on in lower levels when they deal with mentees. Junior people can provide information to mentors…. [They] are up on the latest technology and knowledge. So it’s an interactive process: Mentors and protégés become co-learners.”

Here are some tips for selecting a mentor:

1. Choose someone you (and others) respect.
Identify an individual who you admire who has accomplished things you hope to accomplish some day.

2. Your mentor should have influence and power in the organization.
This, along with their knowledge, experience and competence, will help to open doors and introduce you to other influential people in the organization.

3. He or she is willing to invest time and is committed to your success.
Look for a respected person who is your senior and is willing to invest time in – and take responsibility for – your success and development. Likely candidates are executives with a reputation for helping others succeed.

4. Good mentors ask tough questions and hold you accountable.
Honesty and trust are critical in a mentoring relationship. He or she will offer constructive criticism when necessary, but will also take joy in your triumphs. The situation is considered ideal when both individuals – the mentor and the mentee – learn and grow as a result of the relationship.

5. Work with a mentor who is positive and enthusiastic.
Your goal is not just to learn from a mentor, but to be inspired. A good mentor is upbeat and optimistic. If you’re energized and raring to go after meeting with him or her, you’ll know you’ve selected the ideal person!

Are you ready to take action to make that next promotion happen? Sign up for Joel’s Career Advancement Coaching program and learn exactly what you need to do to take your career to the next level.

Talkback: Do you have a mentor? How did you find him or her? Do you have any tips to add for our readers?

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Conquer Your Critical Inner Voice

overcoming feelings of inadequacy

“I was always looking outside myself for strength and confidence, but it comes from within. It is there all the time.”

~ Anna Freud ~

When Your Inner Voice Keeps Telling You “No”

Client Suzanna Asks: Sometimes I think I am my own worst critic. I constantly catch myself thinking, “That wasn’t good enough” or “You really screwed up this time.” How can I turn this around?

Coach Joel Answers: Self-evaluation can be a positive experience. It helps us learn, correct our mistakes and improve our performance, as well as the perceptions others have of us.

According to psychologist Terry Paulson, it’s estimated that a typical person makes 300 to 400 self-evaluations every day.

That’s a lot of opportunities for self-improvement.

But here’s the rub.

Dr. Paulson says that, for most people, 80% of these self-evaluations are negative!

It’s almost impossible to maintain a positive attitude at work when your inner voice is constantly hammering you for “messing up.” After awhile, self-doubt erodes your confidence and you’ll be tempted to avoid speaking up or taking risks. Instead, you decide to keep a low profile.

Employees with low profiles are less likely to get promoted or assigned key, career enhancing projects. And, when the economy heads south, they are more likely to be laid off.

That’s why it’s important to challenge your critical inner voice.

Here are a few ways to do it:

1. Keep Your Antenna Up.
Be aware when your inner voice is saying “no.” Ask yourself, “Why?” Try to discover the “real” reason you’re being self-critical.

2. Conduct an Impromptu Risk Assessment.
If there is risk involved, ask, “What’s the worst that can happen?” Clearly, your instincts might be right and your inner voice is trying to keep you from making a horrendous mistake. But, if the nay saying becomes habitual, the real risks may not be as great as you think.

3. Rely on a Mentor or Trusted Colleague.
If you’re not sure that your inner criticism is justified, get a second opinion from a mentor or someone you trust. For example, let’s say you wanted to speak up at a meeting, but your “gut instinct” told you “no.” So you remained silent. Ask your mentor, “I wanted to tell the department head that I thought his idea would hurt customer service, but I was afraid to. Was I right? What would you have done?”

4. Celebrate Your Successes.
Some self-criticism is justified, but can you possibly be wrong (as the statistics suggest) 80 percent of the time? Celebrate those instances when you challenge your inner voice and something positive results.

5. Learn From Your Mistakes.
Obviously, you’re bound to make mistakes when you take risks. Instead of bashing yourself about what went wrong, concentrate on what you learned from the experience and how you’ll handle similar situations in the future.

6. End Each Day on a Winning Note.
Dr. Paulson suggests concluding each day by “catching yourself being effective.” He also says to “use your calendar to record one success. You may be winning and not know it if you’re not keeping score!”

When you can minimize the self-criticism, you can be more confident in who you are and what you are capable of doing. With this confidence you’ll trust yourself more and have the conviction to believe in your ideas. You’ll speak up no matter someone’s title, superiority or influence.

If your inner voice is holding you back from doing the things you know you need to do to get ahead, Joel’s career advancement coaching program may be the answer for you. Click here for more information.

Talkback: Is your inner voice overly critical? How do you overcome the negativity and remain confident in your abilities?

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Position Yourself for a Promotion
& Prepare to Move Up the Ladder

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“The ladder of success is best climbed by stepping on the rungs of opportunity.”

~ Ayn Rand ~

Tammy is good at her job, but her career doesn’t seem to be going anywhere. She has been in the same position for two years and is ready to move up to the next rung of the ladder. One of her co-workers was just promoted to the position she wanted, and now she wonders if she will be stuck in her current position forever.

Getting a promotion requires more effort than merely doing your job and being good at it. Supervisors want to see that you are qualified for the new position, not the one you are already doing. You must stay alert for opportunities to advance or to move laterally to broaden your skills and position yourself for future success.

If you are like Tammy—good at your job but not quite ready for a promotion—here are five tips to help you get out in front of your competition so you are the first person your supervisor thinks of next time there is an opportunity for promotion:

1. Express Your Interest 
Let your supervisor know you’re ready for new challenges and want to play a role in any expansion efforts. As companies look for growth opportunities, they will form task forces, study teams and interdepartmental committees. Tell your boss you want to be a participant, not a bystander.

2. Stay on Top of Current Events 
Stay alert of your company’s growth plans by reading its news releases and annual and quarterly reports. Get copies of executive speeches and reports from investment firms that follow your company. Then brainstorm how you and your skills can contribute to the success of these ventures.

3. Write Your Own Marketing Plan 
If you see an opportunity to market a new product or service, grow your company’s existing portfolio or increase client service, create your own marketing plan. Do your homework, crunch the numbers and write up a proposal to present to your boss or senior management. Even if you fail, you’ll reap dividends from the exposure and gain the reputation that you want to play a bigger role in the success of your organization.

4. Take Advantage of New Training 
As companies loosen their purse strings, they’ll also be investing more in training and development. Visit with your supervisor or human resources department to find out what new skills you need to improve your effectiveness and promotability.

5. Network, Network, Network 
Keeping your nose to the grindstone is admirable, but it will also pay to get away from your computer and stay actively involved with your network. Keep on top of what other departments and divisions are doing, what their plans are, and how you might fit in.

As your company gears up for growth, find ways to increase your visibility and to showcase your talents to decision-makers in your organization. When in doubt, look for problems to solve. That’s one of the effective ways to get noticed, appreciated and promoted!

If you really want to move up the career ladder quickly, a top-notch executive coach like Joel Garfinkle can help you reach your goals twice as fast. If you’re serious about getting ahead, sign up for executive coaching with Joel today.

Talkback: How long have you been in your current position? Are you ready for a change? What do you need to work on to position yourself for your next promotion?

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Be Carried to the Top:
5 Support People Who Can Help You Get Ahead

Team

“There is no such thing as a self-made man. You will reach your goals only with the help of others.”

~ George Shinn ~

Client Dena Asks: In their book, The Five Patterns of Extraordinary Careers, James Citrin and Richard Smith concluded that, “People with extraordinary careers do not claw their way to the top, they are carried there.”Where can I get the support I need to help me reach my career goals?

Coach Joel Answers: Support from others is a valuable commodity in any situation, but it’s a necessity when you navigate the corporate landscape. Without it, you risk being stuck in your current position indefinitely, overlooked for promotion and passed by others who are well connected and better supported.

How can you find others to help “carry” you?

Cultivate and take advantage of these five key resources:

1. Supporters 
Supporters show an interest in you and your career and invest the time to explain what it takes to advance within the company and get the job you want. They help you get ahead by providing resources, insights and knowledge. They also serve as role models for top-notch executive behavior and presence. Supporters can provide feedback, criteria and expectations to help guide you along a clear path toward success.

2. Confidants 
A confidant is someone with whom you are comfortable disclosing information about your experiences at work. Because these discussions often involve fears, frustrations and your innermost doubts and concerns, a confidant must be completely trustworthy. This kind of trust takes time to develop, but it starts with taking risks and being willing to share. Confidants are there to listen, to provide honest feedback and to support you as you face major challenges.

3. Mentors 
Like a supporter, a mentor provides specific information and guidance to help you improve your performance and productivity. You will, however, have a closer relationship with a mentor. This individual will take a personal interest in your career and play a more active role in helping you meet your goals for advancement and professional success. To ensure your mentor is unbiased, it’s helpful if he or she comes from a different department.

4. Advocates 
The difference between mentors and advocates is a matter of degree. Both can provide feedback, information and encouragement. However, a mentor will not necessarily get directly involved in promoting your career. Advocates, on the other hand, will actively champion your cause to their peers (and even supervisors) in the company. Advocates encourage your growth and challenge you to reach higher levels. They know your key accomplishments and are acutely aware of your potential for future success. Armed with this information, advocates campaign on your behalf, create visibility with senior management and directly assist you in advancing up the organization.

5. Executive Coaches 
In addition to supporters, mentors and advocates, another effective source of support is the executive coach. Executive coaches are to business professionals what master musicians are to aspiring performers: they guide the thriving careers of their clients to help them reach the peak of their abilities. Executive coaches have the expertise, techniques and tools to assist you in achieving what you most want in half the time. They provide honest and objective third party feedback and help you develop the skills and mindset you need to move beyond limitations, resistance and self-doubt.

They can help carry you to the top.

The obvious goal in seeking supporters, mentors, and advocates is to secure help with professional development and future promotions. But the underlying objective is to form alliances with those peers and superiors who want the best for you. In the process, they will encourage your growth and challenge you to reach higher levels within the company.

Are you building a support team to help you get ahead at work? Start by hiring a top-notch executive coach. Joel Garfinkle can create a cusomized executive coaching program that is tailored to helping you reach your goals.

Talkback: Have you started building your support team? Who will help carry you to the top?

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