Motivational Speaker to Enhance Personal Growth & Communication

Announcement Communication Speech to People Crowd

“Recognize, manage and master your beliefs. They aren’t genetic. They are choices. Choose ones that serve you.”

~ Christopher Babson ~

Larry felt he was out of ideas.  He put in his time at work, but he found so much to frustrate him he got to the point where he almost didn’t care anymore.  He knew he needed an attitude adjustment. He wanted a way to get enthusiastic and happy with his job.

But he wasn’t getting any help from work or family, or anyone. Finally Larry decided to take action on his own. He signed up to hear a motivational speaker. Larry wasn’t sure what to expect.  What he got was beyond anything he imagined.

The motivational speaker helped both his professional and personal growth.  He learned things he could use at work and in all the other areas of his life.

  • Real, actionable information. Larry learned things about thought patterns and road blocks he’d been putting in front of himself. This information freed him to explore new ways. It was like a door opened to new opportunities both at work and in his personal life.
  • Guidance and direction. Larry recognized he’d been lacking direction. The fixes offered by the motivational speaker were things Larry could apply immediately. He felt like he left with an achievable game plan.
  • Communication. Larry learned where he was failing to communicate well. He immediately saw how that was making work more difficult. He also saw how these new skills would help him with his wife and children. He knew as he made these changes he would be more effective. It was exciting to feel himself growing and changing so quickly.
  • Enthusiasm. Something about the motivational speaker was contagious. As Larry sat in the room he felt his life expanding. It was such a change to feel good about life! He knew this was what he’d been missing. He felt like he was learning enough that he could maintain these feelings of enthusiasm and excitement.
  • Attitude.  Larry felt a personal change in attitude. He determined to stop blaming others and focus on the things he could control. The speaker helped him see how an adjustment in his attitude could change the way he viewed both home and work.
  • Focus. Instead of taking a scattered approach to what he learned, Larry decided to focus on the things that would make the most difference in his personal growth.  He knew if he could change some of his habits and behaviors, it would show improvement in all areas of his life.

Larry left the seminar eager to get started.  “I honestly felt like a new person,” Larry said.  “I knew I could not keep on this high forever, but for me it was a game changer.”

Larry listed the new skills and ways to communicate. Each week he took one of the skills and worked to master it. “It’s really made a difference in all areas of my life,” Larry said. “I expected the motivational speaker to help with work. And it did.  I’m so much happier there. But I was surprised at how much I grew personally. My wife and kids really like the new me.”

If you are looking for personal growth, increased enthusiasm, guidance, direction and actionable skills, go listen Joel, a great motivational speaker. Contact Joel to learn where he is speaking next.

Talkback: Have you had good success listening to a motivational speaker? How has it benefited you?
Image courtesy of kbuntu / Fotolia.com

7 Competencies Successful HR Executive MUST Know

Word cloud business concept, human resource

“Nothing splendid has ever been achieved except by those who dared believe that something inside them was superior to circumstance.”

~ Bruce Barton ~

Client Amanda Asks: I know the face of HR is changing. It’s really important for me to be on top of the game.  What competencies will insure my success as an HR executive?

Coach Joel Answers: You are right on target, Amanda.  There is ongoing evaluation of what an HR executive should do or be.

Perhaps one of the most innovative is the change from task orientation to influencer. Executives no longer just apply the decisions of company management, they help create change.  They strategize, and help shape the company culture.

Here are seven traits that will keep you in the forefront of all human resources executives.

1. Business knowledge. The bottom line fundamentals of business are essential for every executive, regardless of area of expertise.  HR leaders are no exception.  You need to understand the value of your business. You must be able to explain the value and business model to others.

And, of course, you need skills to keep you current with business technology. Know the latest in software and hardware to be efficient and innovative.

2. Company culture. In the past, you lived with the company culture. Now, you will get ahead if you help to shape that culture.  You know the values that keep talent and those that push them away.

Help form a company culture that will attract and keep the finest employees. Help your people understand the culture.  Assist them to apply it to advance their success as well.

3. People Management. Of course this is the traditional strength of HR.  You must implement workplace policies. Know best practices for hiring, payroll, employee assessments and so on.

Understand the administrative side and oversee the day-to-day work of the people in the company.

4. Strategy expert.  This is a new area of competency for HR executives. You will join with management in executing strategy.  You’ll assist other managers and leaders to help them make the right changes happen.  They may look to you for guidance in moving from vision to reality as it applies to your human resources.

5. Be credible. Ethics matter.  HR executives may be the standard bearer for integrity.  When people know they can trust you, you gain respect.  Then you will be listened to.

You’ll have a chance to offer points of view.  This is part of the new competencies.  You may take a position and actually challenge assumptions.  You are in a place to influence people and policy, but it takes credibility and integrity to make it work for you

Gain that credibility as you deliver results, share information, and build relationships of trust.  Then use that credibility to influence others.

6. Organizational designer. In HR, a successful executive knows organizational theory.  They do the research to tailor it to their company.  They don’t just do things because they’ve always been done that way.  They plan the best organization and then work to implement it.

It may be a matter of designing a motivating rewards system.  You may implement successful feedback and reviews.  Or design a mentoring program or cross pollination to increase your talent pool.

7. Talent management.  Traditionally and always, a core competency of every successful HR executive centers around succession planning.  You need to ensure both today’s quality workers and tomorrow’s talent. You’ll create systems for recognizing and developing talent.  You’ll reward that talent.

Amanda, if you master these seven competencies you will be a powerful HR executive. Success will come your way.  You’ll have the admiration of others and be a strong influence in your company.

Want to strengthen one or more of your competencies in human resources leadership? Contact Joel for individual help.

Talkback: What competencies have you found to be essential for your HR executives?

Image courtesy of WavebreakmediaMicro / Fotolia.com

5 Ways Team Building Activities can Benefit Your Company

08-shutterstock_126489416

“Remember upon the conduct of each depends the fate of all.”

~ Alexander the Great ~

During the past few decades, corporations have changed the environments of their workplace; they have switched from a very competitive environment to a cooperative one. Why would they want to do this? Competition sparks motivation, which means more productivity, right?

This may very well be true; however, the benefits of having a cooperative work environment outshine those of a competitive one any day.

A cooperative work environment leaves room for team building activities and personal effectiveness. In return, team building activities lead to many amazing changes at the office.

1. Increases Creativity

Often times, employees are stuck in a groove where they perform the same type of tasks in the same manner from week to week. These actions allow for little to no creativity because they create a cycle where the employee feels stuck.

Team building activities have the ability to change this because they remove employees from their regular day-to-day tasks by giving them a not-so-ordinary project, which gives them the ability to use their imagination to find a solution.

In the end, team building activities show employees that creativity is welcome at the office. Letting employees know that creativity is not only welcomed but also encouraged at work should be a goal for employers because creativity can lead to innovation, which leads to higher productivity.

2. Team Building Activities Will Boost Employee Engagement

Communicate is key to success. If you want to have a successful relationship with your family, significant other, or friends, you need to foster communication with them and the same goes for a successful workplace.

Moreover, team building activities lead to employee engagement, which leads to increased productivity. Employee engagement and effective communication go hand-in-hand. Those who feel like they can communicate effectively with their co-workers will be more likely to promote employee engagement.

Often times, firms experience the opposite of this and the result is catastrophic; co-workers end up working against each other, which puts the company in jeopardy. However, when paired into teams, co-workers work together to reach the same goals.

3. Increase Profits

The end goal for a company is to make profits, right? Most likely the answer to that question is yes; however, if a company solely focuses on that aspect, they will be destined to fall apart. Instead, firms can focus on employee satisfaction and their happiness.

When firms focus on activities that promote employee satisfaction and engagement, they are more likely to have a smaller employee turnover. Having a high employee turnover is bad news for a company; it means that they are losing thousands of dollars in recruiting and training and it also means that their employees are unhappy.

Employees are more focused on productivity when they are satisfied with their work environment. Therefore, it is key to ensure a creative and healthy company culture that promotes effective communication through team building activities.

What Are Your Thoughts?

There are tons of other reasons why team building activities benefit companies. Can you name a few? Leave your suggestions and questions in the comment section below!

Jeffrey Fermin is Officevibe’s cofounder and is in charge of all marketing efforts and business development for the company.

Image courtesy of ratch / Fotolia.com

Setting Work Performance Goals
with Your Employees

Goal setting

“Discipline is the bridge between goals and accomplishment”

~Jim Rohn~

Setting Work Performance Goals with Your Employees

If you are in a leadership position, you are constantly faced with the challenge of keeping your employees motivated and productive. Most companies use work performance goals as a means of evaluating employees. However, from the employee’s point of view, they are often looked on as an arbitrary and rigid means of doling out raises. That is because many organizations fail to use goals properly.

Goals are most effective when the individual expected to meet them has a part in setting them. As a manager it is important to put yourself in the place of the employee and ask yourself these basic questions:

  • What kind of goals would motivate me in this position?
  • What sort of goals would make me happier and more productive in this position?

With these two questions in mind and with the help of the following pointers, employees will no longer view goals as mere management tools but rather as they should be: personal motivators for success that can help your employees succeed.

1. Include employees in the process

But give them guidance along the way. As their manager, you know best what they need to achieve in order to meet company objectives. But having them contribute to their own goal setting in a meaningful way will also help motivate them to meet the performance goals for their jobs. Failing to reach a goal we set for ourselves is always harder to swallow than failing to reach a goal we think leadership arbitrarily set for us. On a side note, having the employee help set goals will give you valuable insight into what motivates each individual.

2. Set deadlines

Open-ended goals promote procrastination. Many companies employ quarterly goals in conjunction with long-term annual goals. However, short-term goals will also provide an ongoing metric of the employee’s progress.  Deadlines should also be set according to the rhythm of the metric they measure. For example, if you are servicing clients on monthly contracts then the goals should naturally have a monthly deadline. In such a case, weekly or bi-weekly goals will help the employee keep on track with reaching their objectives.

3. Make goals measurable

For goals to work they must be tied to some quantifiable data. That way when the deadline arrives there is no question whether the goal was reached or not. If you are unsure of how to measure success, enlist the help of your employee.

4. Give feedback

Regular feedback is vital in helping your employees reach the goals set for their work performance.  When speaking to them, look for opportunities to give encouragement. But don’t allow the feedback to be one-sided. Listen to any concerns or suggestions the employee may have. Open communication may make the difference between a goal that is simply reached and one that is blown out of the water.

5. Reward success

Make the reward worth the work needed to obtain it. Again, consider what the employee will value. Some employees respond to cash incentives, extra time off, or gift cards. Others may prefer the public recognition of receiving an award. Who wouldn’t like to display an art glass award on their desk? Allowing the employee to help determine the reward will motivate them to work toward achieving it. Get creative and change rewards frequently so they don’t become routine.

6. Tweak as needed

Some goals will remain the same as long as the company is in business. These strategic goals reflect the core values of the company. But many goals are dynamic and should reflect the changing responsibilities and talents of the employee. Pin job performance goals to areas where the employee can improve. Finally, as the employee gains experience and additional responsibilities, make sure their goals grow with them.

 A note on failure:

If an employee fails to meet their goals, it is not the end of the world. Of paramount importance is the attitude of the employee. Did their failure result from a lack of activity, or did they give their best but simply come up short? If an employee has put forth noticeable effort and still failed it would be counterproductive for a manager to humiliate or punish them. Failure from inactivity is what should be punished.

Performance goals are a benchmark of success. As long as an employee continues putting forth effort to reach them, they should continue to receive support from their managers. If you are having a hard time with this idea, consider some of the great failures in history. These would include the likes of Einstein, da Vinci, and Michael Jordan. Although known for their successes, these individuals had greater failure rates than their peers. But they kept striving toward their goals and eventually reached them.

 Dennis Phoenix is a human resource specialist and avid business writer. He writes primarily on topics ranging from business relationships to employee satisfaction for Able Trophies.

Talkback: How have you increased the effectiveness of your employees work performance goals? List your ideas below. 

Image courtesy of MarzkyRagsac Jr./ Fotolia.com

4 Ways to Utilize your Finances
for Employee Retention

03  shutterstock_140631424

“Start by doing what is necessary, then what is possible, and suddenly you are doing the impossible.”

~St. Francis of Assisi~

Client Sarah Asks:  In this economy, money has to work very hard for us.  We want to retain our best employees.  How should we allocate our finances to maximize our retention?

Coach Joel Answers: That’s a great question, Sarah.  Your company has a number of options—different ways to spend your money.  To best motivate your workers to stay with you, you first need to understand them.

Not all workers respond the same way.  Some of your options have tax consequences that might matter to your top talent.  Others may perceive one or another of these choices as more prestigious or of greater value to them.

So your first step is to know your key players.  Assess them.  Find out what is most enticing and likely to keep them working for you.

Then choose from these four methods those that will work best for you, your employees, and your company.

1. Competitive salary. This is the first rabbit most businesses pull out of the bag.  And for a very good reason.  It is effective.A salary that pays market value means there’s no financial incentive for your worker to leave.  They can’t expect a better offer elsewhere.  And when you pay a little above average, workers may feel they are being paid extra for any small inconveniences that come with the job.

2. Bonuses.  Sometimes companies need to see how their finances play out before they can reward their employees.   They may give workers an average salary with the promise of a bonus if the company does well.

This has the added advantage of offering motivation.  Each employee sees their salary more connected to the success of the company.  They may make that extra effort to help the company succeed.

The benefit to you, Sarah, is that the company keeps its bottom line lower in difficult years, but can reward employees and keep retention up by promising bonuses in good years.

3. Fringe Benefits. Top talent may be motivated to stay with the company for certain perks.  The choice corner office.  Company car. Use of the company jet. Pizza Fridays. A nice company gym or offering child care.

Some fringe benefits offer prestige and status that is more enticing than money alone. Some may fill a compelling need of your workers.

Here is where you really need to know your employees.  What kinds of fringe benefits connect with them?  Is this something that makes financial sense to the company?  Perhaps birthday recognitions are low cost, but highly satisfying to your workers.  That leaves money on the table for other retention methods.

4. Stock options or company ownership. When employees are vested with company stock options or a chance to buy into the business you strengthen their commitment to their job.  They are much less likely to leave.

You need to decide if this is a financially viable option for employee retention.  Does it make sense in your business model?

Sarah, you are wise to consider the best uses of your company’s finances to increase worker retention.  With the cost of hiring and retraining, it makes more sense to invest in keeping workers satisfied and happy.  You gain the benefit of experienced workers. And happy employees are more productive.

To understand your worker’s motivations and develop a retention plan designed for success, contact Joel.

Talkback: What has your company done to retain employees?  What has been most successful?

Image courtesy of DeiMosz/ Fotolia.com