3 ways to self-promote without self-promoting

“Heroes must see to their own fame. No one else will.”
~ Gore Vidal ~

Nathan felt it was time to raise his visibility. He knew he needed this just to keep his job in a tight market. He especially needed to get recognition if he hoped to advance. But no one likes a show-off or a know-it-all. So Nathan struggled with how to accomplish good self-promotion in the workplace without coming off in a negative way?

He decided to use three simple ways to let other in the workplace know of his good work. It’s self-promotion without sounding like your tooting your own horn.

  1. Share your accomplishments
  2. You’d love to have your work speak for itself. After all, it’s good work. But merit is determined by people— by human judgement. That’s a blend of information, viewpoint, and emotional filters. In order for the person who determines merit to appreciate your work, several things have to happen, including sharing of your accomplishments.

    • They have to know about the work.
    • They have to know that YOU did the work
    • They have to understand the time, effort, intelligence, and skills it took to accomplish the job
    • They need to see how it benefits the company

    They can’t get all this by osmosis. Someone needs to at least get them the “Cliff’s Notes” of your involvement in the job. You can do that several ways

    • Send a brief report to your boss or the influencer about the job. It could be in the form of a question. “I did this, and this and this…am I on track? What would you like next?”
    • Ask a mentor or senior in your organization to publically or privately pass on recognition of your accomplishments.
    • Request a co-worker write a letter of recommendation about your efforts on the task.
  3. Make your competence visible
  4. Nathan read that studies show it’s not the most competent that gets promoted, it’s the most visible. No one likes a boss that is less competent than they are. It’s not good for you or for the company. In self-defense, Nathan needs to have his competence shine. Decision makers need to know of your abilities.

    • Speak up in meetings
    • Offer to present material
    • Check with your boss or others and share what you are working on
    • Come to your review process prepared to show and explain your part in the work and in strengthening the company’s bottom line
  5. Educate others on your value

When you promote others, you often promote yourself as well. Nathan has been producing excellent results for his company. But he had not done a very good job of self-promotion. He hadn’t been sharing wins and accomplishments in his workplace.

He decided to write an email that outlined five specific things his team had done in the past month. He made sure each point had measurable results. He said, “I’m very proud of the work this team has done and wanted to take a moment to highlight their accomplishments.”

Notice it does not look like self-promotion since Nathan is giving accolades to his team. Yet it still reflects well on him.

The CTO wrote back, “Thanks for pointing this out and congratulations to the team. The quiet success of these accomplishments from you and your team has not gone unnoticed. The CEO and senior leadership were much appreciative.” He encouraged Nathan to keep them informed about their work and the value they bring. The CTO recognized that sometimes work that goes well goes unnoticed, yet, he said, “It is important we educate the business on the value we bring.”

Self-promotion, well done, can build your visibility and lead to advancement. It helps management do a better job of recognizing who are their truly skilled workers. It also helped Nathan feel more valued and gain more satisfaction from his job.

If you need to increase your visibility and promote yourself in your workplace, first evaluate your visibility.

Talkback:
What have you done for self-promotion? Has it worked? Has it come off brash, or confident?

The 5 Smartest Strategies to Build Influence in the Workplace

“Leadership is intentional influence.” ~Michael McKinney~

Client Brianna asks:

People often talk about the importance of influencing internal and external stakeholders. What makes a successful influencer, in your eyes?

Coach Joel answers:

Successful influencers do these five things better than anyone else. These five strategies foster strong relationships that make others see those influencers as people they can rely on. If you succeed in putting these five things into practice in your daily work, you’re just about guaranteed to build influence in your workplace.

  • Build strong partnerships. A strong influencer is able to create partnerships across all business units, thereby developing a wider base of support and cooperation. When you develop these strong relationships, you’ll help the whole organization to function more effectively—and you’ll be seen as someone who guides others in developing relationships that benefit the whole group.
  • Leverage allies. Your allies will help support your ideas and accomplish the tasks that have been deemed important. Successful influencers cultivate alliances with people across the company who are in positions of leadership or who have strong social capital. Influencers stay in close communication with these allies and have the confidence to ask for what they want. They know how to clearly articulate their needs for support to these allies, spelling out how their request will benefit the whole organization.
  • Cause others to rely on them. Because successful influencers shape group decisions and change outcomes for the better, people appreciate their confidence and know they can depend on them. Higher-ups as well as people they supervise come to them for advice and ideas. To get higher-ups to rely on them, successful influencers might become experts in areas that most people aren’t knowledgeable in, filling in important gaps. They might also demonstrate their ability to creatively solve problems that everyone else avoids. The people they supervise feel empowered by talking with them, because influencers give them guidance in developing and implementing their own ideas.
  • Lead up. When building your influence within your workplace, don’t just work to lead those who are below you on the hierarchy. Leadership isn’t about having a title. Influencers establish mutual respect with people above them, who seek out and listen to their opinions, ideas, and insights as a result. Voice your input to these key players with confidence, using your existing relationships with key players to reach new ones. For instance, if you have a suggestion for improving a product development strategy, present it to an advocate and ask for help in connecting with decision-makers. Carefully craft your rationale for your ideas and suggestions before speaking with those further up the hierarchy, and voice your input to these key players with confidence.
  • Gain results from others. Strong influencers know how to keep others motivated, lighting a fire under them to succeed. That means making them believe they can achieve their goals. They also work to create a positive environment that makes employees happy to come to work. As you become a person who gets results from others, you’ll inspire them to keep taking on more ambitious tasks that positively impact the company’s bottom line.

When you master these five qualities, you’ll have become a successful leader in your organization. You don’t need to be in a formal leadership position to hone and utilize these qualities. As you naturally assume more of an informal leadership role, a work promotion is likely to follow. Don’t wait until someone else gives you the green light—begin stepping into a leadership position now, by developing these key skills. Your influence in the workplace will keep building as you grow more practiced in all of these areas.

Try focusing on one of these five qualities each week. Email Joel to discuss your progress and how you can continue improving.

Talkback:
Have you tried any of these strategies? What were your results?

Don’t Let Your Work Speak for Itself: 3 Ways to Increase Your Visibility

“Setting goals is the first step in turning the invisible into the visible.”
~Anthony Robbins~

Anne asks:

The people I work with on a daily basis appreciate the work I produce. But I’m having trouble expanding my reputation for high-quality work beyond them. How should I approach my work in order to become more visible in my workplace?

Joel replies:

Here are a few strategies that will help you gain visibility, which requires careful self-branding. In contrast, passively letting your quality work speak for itself would leave you unnoticed, although many people view this as their sole strategy for advancement. These strategies will help you create a strong visibility plan that will make key players throughout your organization appreciate your great work.

  • Identify key decision makers in your company and gain exposure to them. Make a list of all the key decision makers in your organization, and create a strategy for becoming visible to each of them. You might have another colleague who can introduce you to them, for instance. Once you gain visibility and a rapport with these individuals, you can contact them for advice, support, or mentorship.
  • Gain face time with the C-level executives. Don’t be intimidated by a person’s title, reputation, or fame. After all, they were all where you are today at one time in their careers. Reach out to them and make sure they know who you are. They will genuinely appreciate your initiative.
  • Share your exciting achievements with all of these higher-ups. Remember that you’re not bragging; you’re sharing developments that benefit the whole company. Frame your announcements in this way, focusing on how what you’ve accomplished is helping the organization.
  • Seek out the answer when a higher-level leader asks a question. When a higher-up lacks clarity on an issue and doesn’t have the solution in that moment, work to provide the answer. That person will come to rely on you as a problem-solver, seeing you as creative, driven, and reliable.
  • Speak up during meetings to demonstrate your expertise and self-confidence. Remember, it’s normal to be nervous at first. Prepare thoughts that you want to share in advance, so you’ll be more articulate in the moment. Others will see you as more knowledgeable and capable as you become more vocal in meetings.
  • Ask your mentors to introduce you to top executives. You may have already cultivated relationships with a few mentors who have networks of executives with whom they interact regularly. (If not, work to foster these relationships.) As your mentors get to know you and your work, they’ll come to see that connecting you with these influential individuals will benefit everyone.

In short, don’t make the mistake of assuming you can let your good work itself speak to your skills and talents in a way that makes others take notice. You need a strong self-promotion strategy to advance in your career. Follow this advice, and you’ll get there.

Call to Action:
Want more advice on how to increase your visibility in the workplace? Evaluate your visibility via assessment so you can learn the ten areas you must emphasize to be visible.

Talkback:
Have you used any of these tips for increasing your visibility? What results did you see?

5-Step Plan to Developing Your Personal Brand

Developing Your Personal Brand

“Behavior is the mirror in which everyone shows their image.”

~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe ~

Jason has been with his company for more than five years. He’s tried every trick in the book to get ahead, from letting his boss know he’d like to move up the ladder to working overtime on his projects in the hopes that his efforts would be noticed and rewarded.

But nothing seems to be working. He still has the same job, same title, and (sadly) the same salary as when he started five years ago. What’s Jason doing wrong?

Maybe Jason is not doing anything wrong; maybe he’s just doing the wrong things.

If you want to boost your personal brand, forget about dropping hints or hoping someone will notice the long hours you’re putting in. Those tactics will get you nowhere fast.

Luckily, one of the books Jason read as part of his effort to get ahead was a how-to book about career advancement. He decided to use some of his acquired knowledge to solve his own problem. Here’s what he came up with:

  • Step 1—Define the problem.

Jason’s first reaction was, “I’m being ignored. I deserve a promotion and I’m not getting one.”

  • Step 2 – State the cause of the problem.

This is an important step, because often when people try to solve problems, they are merely getting rid of the symptoms, not resolving the issue. After a bit of soul-searching, Jason realized that he really wasn’t doing what it takes to stand out in the crowd. Hard work is fine, but he needed a personal brand and he definitely did not have one.

  • Step 3 – Brainstorm.

Come up with potential actions you could take to turn the situation around. Jason talked to a few trusted friends outside his workplace and they gave him a number of useful suggestions and opinions.

  • Take on a project that nobody wants to do and finish it successfully.
  • Offer to work on a project outside your own department (with your boss’s approval, of course).
  • Schedule a one-on-one with your boss and ask for her input on a rebranding plan.
  • Find a mentor. This could be in your company or outside of it, but should be someone who’s ahead of you on the ladder (not your boss).
  • Share your successes. Don’t brag, and don’t be modest either. Speak up about your accomplishments. This includes what you’ve been doing, either in meetings, by e-mail, or one-on-one with others in the company.
  • Share credit. Nobody does it alone and you’ll get ahead more easily if you let others participate in your success.
  • Step 4 – Choose your options.

You don’t have to do everything all at once. Pick two or three things you can do right away. Jason took the first two suggestions on his list and wrote up a plan. Then he scheduled the one-on-one with his boss to get her input and suggestions. After refining his plan, he immediately began putting it into action.

  • Step 5 – Monitor your results and make changes if necessary.

Jason first volunteered to revamp an inventory control project that nobody else would touch, because it looked boring and complicated. He cleaned that up and then made a presentation about how he implemented a new plan and achieved results. With his boss’s approval, he sent a summary of his presentation to several C-level executives.

Five months after Jason implemented his rebranding campaign, he was offered a management position in another department—and a nice increase in salary to go with it.

If you’re stuck where you are right now, feeling unnoticed and unappreciated, (not to mention underpaid), how could you rebrand yourself? Look at Jason’s action items and see if you can adapt any of them to your situation. And be sure you’re solving the problem, not covering up the symptom. Joel has helped dozens of clients boost their careers with personal branding. Email him today.

Talkback: Have you successfully rebranded yourself? What did you do and what were the results? Share your experience here.

Image courtesy of Shutterstock/ shutterstock.com

4 Daily Habits That Build Good Working Relationships

Daily Habits

“If everyone is moving forward together, then success takes care of itself.”

~ Henry Ford ~

Client Paul asks: One of my coworkers recently told me I’m hard to approach at work. It felt like kind of a blow, since I’ve always thought of myself as being a nice person. How can I change this impression my coworkers have of me?

Coach Joel answers: Paul, developing good relationships is a key part of succeeding at work, yet it’s often neglected. Do you ever have days where you keep your nose to the grindstone, churning out work—and feel like slamming shut your door on anyone who dares interrupt? This kind of attitude actually hurts your own productivity as well as your organization’s. Building good working relationships will help you become a more effective leader, boost your chances of promotion, enhance teamwork, and make you a happier person. These 8 daily habits will help you get there.

1. Communicate clear goals and expectations.

When you communicate clearly—and follow through—you show you’re a trustworthy person. Set clear goals and benchmarks for what you’ll accomplish in projects and your overall job performance, and help those you supervise to do the same. Choose the best medium for your communications, too. If sharing a complicated list of instructions, share it by email or as a hard copy in addition to going over it in person.

2. Share appreciation for others.

Noticing others’ contributions, large or small, will give them a more positive image of you. If others are feeling constantly judged or critiqued, it will be difficult for them to engage in creative, collaborative thinking with you. Knowing they are valued will help them share ideas more freely. Sharing your appreciation also conveys a positive attitude, which exudes confidence in your team.

3. Spend one-on-one time with team members.

Getting to know coworkers will help you develop good relationships at work. The one-on-one time also promotes openness and collaboration. Go to lunch with someone from a different department, who might have skills that will be useful for a future project. Have coffee with a coworker you haven’t developed a rapport with, and find out what you have in common. Just knowing you care enough to make this time will help break the ice.

4. Address interpersonal problems directly.

If tension is brewing or you have a difficult relationship with a co-worker, address it at the source before the problem gets bigger. If you feel that a team member is not pulling his weight, voice your concerns to him and state your expectations. Keep your tone calm and professional, and give him time to explain his perspective. Through direct communication, you may discover that the real problem is that he doesn’t understand his role, or that he’s wearing too many hats in the organization. Confronting the communication difficulty directly is one of the quickest ways to create good working relationships.

By adopting these daily habits, you’ll increase your coworkers’ respect and confidence in you. . Fortunately, they’re called “habits” for a reason—as you start doing these things on a daily basis, you’ll naturally remember to do them in more situations and with more of the people you encounter.

Try using at least two of these habits per day for the next week. Take notes on how people respond, and email Joel with follow-up questions about your results.

Talkback: Have you found these tips useful in your workplace? Do you have others you’d like to share? Post your ideas below!

Image courtesy of Shutterstock/ shutterstock.com