3 ways to self-promote without self-promoting

“Heroes must see to their own fame. No one else will.”
~ Gore Vidal ~

Nathan felt it was time to raise his visibility. He knew he needed this just to keep his job in a tight market. He especially needed to get recognition if he hoped to advance. But no one likes a show-off or a know-it-all. So Nathan struggled with how to accomplish good self-promotion in the workplace without coming off in a negative way?

He decided to use three simple ways to let other in the workplace know of his good work. It’s self-promotion without sounding like your tooting your own horn.

  1. Share your accomplishments
  2. You’d love to have your work speak for itself. After all, it’s good work. But merit is determined by people— by human judgement. That’s a blend of information, viewpoint, and emotional filters. In order for the person who determines merit to appreciate your work, several things have to happen, including sharing of your accomplishments.

    • They have to know about the work.
    • They have to know that YOU did the work
    • They have to understand the time, effort, intelligence, and skills it took to accomplish the job
    • They need to see how it benefits the company

    They can’t get all this by osmosis. Someone needs to at least get them the “Cliff’s Notes” of your involvement in the job. You can do that several ways

    • Send a brief report to your boss or the influencer about the job. It could be in the form of a question. “I did this, and this and this…am I on track? What would you like next?”
    • Ask a mentor or senior in your organization to publically or privately pass on recognition of your accomplishments.
    • Request a co-worker write a letter of recommendation about your efforts on the task.
  3. Make your competence visible
  4. Nathan read that studies show it’s not the most competent that gets promoted, it’s the most visible. No one likes a boss that is less competent than they are. It’s not good for you or for the company. In self-defense, Nathan needs to have his competence shine. Decision makers need to know of your abilities.

    • Speak up in meetings
    • Offer to present material
    • Check with your boss or others and share what you are working on
    • Come to your review process prepared to show and explain your part in the work and in strengthening the company’s bottom line
  5. Educate others on your value

When you promote others, you often promote yourself as well. Nathan has been producing excellent results for his company. But he had not done a very good job of self-promotion. He hadn’t been sharing wins and accomplishments in his workplace.

He decided to write an email that outlined five specific things his team had done in the past month. He made sure each point had measurable results. He said, “I’m very proud of the work this team has done and wanted to take a moment to highlight their accomplishments.”

Notice it does not look like self-promotion since Nathan is giving accolades to his team. Yet it still reflects well on him.

The CTO wrote back, “Thanks for pointing this out and congratulations to the team. The quiet success of these accomplishments from you and your team has not gone unnoticed. The CEO and senior leadership were much appreciative.” He encouraged Nathan to keep them informed about their work and the value they bring. The CTO recognized that sometimes work that goes well goes unnoticed, yet, he said, “It is important we educate the business on the value we bring.”

Self-promotion, well done, can build your visibility and lead to advancement. It helps management do a better job of recognizing who are their truly skilled workers. It also helped Nathan feel more valued and gain more satisfaction from his job.

If you need to increase your visibility and promote yourself in your workplace, first evaluate your visibility.

Talkback:
What have you done for self-promotion? Has it worked? Has it come off brash, or confident?

Don’t Let Your Work Speak for Itself: 3 Ways to Increase Your Visibility

“Setting goals is the first step in turning the invisible into the visible.”
~Anthony Robbins~

Anne asks:

The people I work with on a daily basis appreciate the work I produce. But I’m having trouble expanding my reputation for high-quality work beyond them. How should I approach my work in order to become more visible in my workplace?

Joel replies:

Here are a few strategies that will help you gain visibility, which requires careful self-branding. In contrast, passively letting your quality work speak for itself would leave you unnoticed, although many people view this as their sole strategy for advancement. These strategies will help you create a strong visibility plan that will make key players throughout your organization appreciate your great work.

  • Identify key decision makers in your company and gain exposure to them. Make a list of all the key decision makers in your organization, and create a strategy for becoming visible to each of them. You might have another colleague who can introduce you to them, for instance. Once you gain visibility and a rapport with these individuals, you can contact them for advice, support, or mentorship.
  • Gain face time with the C-level executives. Don’t be intimidated by a person’s title, reputation, or fame. After all, they were all where you are today at one time in their careers. Reach out to them and make sure they know who you are. They will genuinely appreciate your initiative.
  • Share your exciting achievements with all of these higher-ups. Remember that you’re not bragging; you’re sharing developments that benefit the whole company. Frame your announcements in this way, focusing on how what you’ve accomplished is helping the organization.
  • Seek out the answer when a higher-level leader asks a question. When a higher-up lacks clarity on an issue and doesn’t have the solution in that moment, work to provide the answer. That person will come to rely on you as a problem-solver, seeing you as creative, driven, and reliable.
  • Speak up during meetings to demonstrate your expertise and self-confidence. Remember, it’s normal to be nervous at first. Prepare thoughts that you want to share in advance, so you’ll be more articulate in the moment. Others will see you as more knowledgeable and capable as you become more vocal in meetings.
  • Ask your mentors to introduce you to top executives. You may have already cultivated relationships with a few mentors who have networks of executives with whom they interact regularly. (If not, work to foster these relationships.) As your mentors get to know you and your work, they’ll come to see that connecting you with these influential individuals will benefit everyone.

In short, don’t make the mistake of assuming you can let your good work itself speak to your skills and talents in a way that makes others take notice. You need a strong self-promotion strategy to advance in your career. Follow this advice, and you’ll get there.

Call to Action:
Want more advice on how to increase your visibility in the workplace? Evaluate your visibility via assessment so you can learn the ten areas you must emphasize to be visible.

Talkback:
Have you used any of these tips for increasing your visibility? What results did you see?

5-Step Plan to Developing Your Personal Brand

Developing Your Personal Brand

“Behavior is the mirror in which everyone shows their image.”

~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe ~

Jason has been with his company for more than five years. He’s tried every trick in the book to get ahead, from letting his boss know he’d like to move up the ladder to working overtime on his projects in the hopes that his efforts would be noticed and rewarded.

But nothing seems to be working. He still has the same job, same title, and (sadly) the same salary as when he started five years ago. What’s Jason doing wrong?

Maybe Jason is not doing anything wrong; maybe he’s just doing the wrong things.

If you want to boost your personal brand, forget about dropping hints or hoping someone will notice the long hours you’re putting in. Those tactics will get you nowhere fast.

Luckily, one of the books Jason read as part of his effort to get ahead was a how-to book about career advancement. He decided to use some of his acquired knowledge to solve his own problem. Here’s what he came up with:

  • Step 1—Define the problem.

Jason’s first reaction was, “I’m being ignored. I deserve a promotion and I’m not getting one.”

  • Step 2 – State the cause of the problem.

This is an important step, because often when people try to solve problems, they are merely getting rid of the symptoms, not resolving the issue. After a bit of soul-searching, Jason realized that he really wasn’t doing what it takes to stand out in the crowd. Hard work is fine, but he needed a personal brand and he definitely did not have one.

  • Step 3 – Brainstorm.

Come up with potential actions you could take to turn the situation around. Jason talked to a few trusted friends outside his workplace and they gave him a number of useful suggestions and opinions.

  • Take on a project that nobody wants to do and finish it successfully.
  • Offer to work on a project outside your own department (with your boss’s approval, of course).
  • Schedule a one-on-one with your boss and ask for her input on a rebranding plan.
  • Find a mentor. This could be in your company or outside of it, but should be someone who’s ahead of you on the ladder (not your boss).
  • Share your successes. Don’t brag, and don’t be modest either. Speak up about your accomplishments. This includes what you’ve been doing, either in meetings, by e-mail, or one-on-one with others in the company.
  • Share credit. Nobody does it alone and you’ll get ahead more easily if you let others participate in your success.
  • Step 4 – Choose your options.

You don’t have to do everything all at once. Pick two or three things you can do right away. Jason took the first two suggestions on his list and wrote up a plan. Then he scheduled the one-on-one with his boss to get her input and suggestions. After refining his plan, he immediately began putting it into action.

  • Step 5 – Monitor your results and make changes if necessary.

Jason first volunteered to revamp an inventory control project that nobody else would touch, because it looked boring and complicated. He cleaned that up and then made a presentation about how he implemented a new plan and achieved results. With his boss’s approval, he sent a summary of his presentation to several C-level executives.

Five months after Jason implemented his rebranding campaign, he was offered a management position in another department—and a nice increase in salary to go with it.

If you’re stuck where you are right now, feeling unnoticed and unappreciated, (not to mention underpaid), how could you rebrand yourself? Look at Jason’s action items and see if you can adapt any of them to your situation. And be sure you’re solving the problem, not covering up the symptom. Joel has helped dozens of clients boost their careers with personal branding. Email him today.

Talkback: Have you successfully rebranded yourself? What did you do and what were the results? Share your experience here.

Image courtesy of Shutterstock/ shutterstock.com

Difference between Male & Female Leadership

businesswoman-840618_1920

” Gender equality is more than a goal in itself. It is a precondition for meeting the challenge of reducing poverty, promoting sustainable development and building good governance.”

~ Kofi Annan ~

Client Julia asks: I’ve tried to find a mentor in my company, but most of the higher-level managers are men, and the way they lead groups doesn’t come naturally to me. Am I just not leadership material?

Coach Joel answers: Julia, you just need to tap into your own strengths as a leader. Empirical research shows that women tend to have a range of strengths that make for a great leader. Women aren’t yet getting equal rewards for these strengths—according to Harvard Business Review, only 3% of Fortune 500 CEOs are women, and just over 5% of executives in Fortune 500 companies are women. However, many qualities women leaders tend to possess are aspects of transformational leadership, which is fast becoming recognized as the most effective leadership style. Transformational leadership motivates employees by helping them find self-worth through the work they do.

That being said, many qualities associated more strongly with men can make for an effective leader as well. The best skills for the job always depend on the context. Both men and women should look at the range of qualities that can make for a great leader, and decide which ones to nurture in themselves, depending on their career goals and personal strengths.

1. Communication Styles

Women tend to have a more cooperative, participatory style of leading. Men tend to have a more “command and control style,” according to the American Psychological Association. They’re more task-oriented and directive, while women are more democratic. That’s often the starkest leadership difference between male and female bosses: Men provide direction for their employees, while women encourage employees to find their own direction. The cooperative style involves more conversation and listening, which often takes more time but leads employees to feel more valued. Both styles are valuable in different contexts. Being highly task-oriented can be highly beneficial where safety is concerned, for example.

2. Reward Systems

Women often motivate their employees by helping them find self-worth and satisfaction in their work, which serves as its own reward. This is a core part of the philosophy of transformational leadership: Help employees find their identity in the work that they do, so it’s more than just a job. Men are more likely to use the transactional leadership approach of providing incentives for succeeding and penalties for failing. Of course, either gender can learn to succeed in either of these leadership styles. Differences in leadership between male and female managers can work in tandem, too, as transactional leaders can ensure accountability while transformational leaders motivate and inspire.

3. Self-Branding

Men tend to be good at branding themselves, meaning they let others know about their successes and strengths. Women are more likely to be modest or silent about their own accomplishments. To succeed as a leader, women should learn to brand themselves by sharing their achievements and skills with others. After all, it’s hard for a person to advance as a leader if people don’t notice what she’s capable of. Branding also brings a leader more respect in her current position. Volunteering for high-profile projects and finding a respected advocate are other great branding strategies that men are often more likely to use than women.

Again, it’s not that people of either gender make better leaders. The reality is that differences between male and female leadership styles can broaden a company’s pool of creativity and innovation. This enhances the success of any company when both men and women are promoted to high-level positions. Whichever gender you are, identify the distinct skills you bring and how to use them to get noticed by potential or current employers. The business of placing women in leadership needs to become a top priority.

Next time you’re in a meeting or talking one-on-one with someone you supervise, take note of which communication, reward systems, and branding styles you use. What comes naturally, and where could you improve? Email Joel for tips on which skills to hone for your career path.

Talkback: Do you feel that your leadership skills are related to your gender? Or do you use skills that aren’t typically associated with your gender? Share your experiences here.

Image courtesy of Pixabay/ pixabay.com

Nine Ways to Stand Out From Your Competition

“Information technology and business are becoming inextricably interwoven. I don’t think anybody can talk meaningfully about one without the talking about the other.”

~Bill Gates ~

Client Ann Asks: I worry that we are not standing out from the competition. My IT Director says that we can gain a competitive advantage through information technology, but I’m not sure how to do this. Can you give me some ideas?

Coach Joel Answers: Ann, you are right on target. It’s vital that your company outshine other similar companies in order to maintain market share. You need things that help you work smarter, faster, and at a cheaper cost. Information technology can help you do all of that.

Let’s look at nine ways to improve your bottom line, support the team effort, handle paperwork, and gain more loyal customers.

When you employ some of these IT systems, you’ll feel more in control, you’ll save time, and you’ll see results.

1. Web Presence. Help your business be easily found. Make your website inviting, informative, and easy to navigate. You’ll find you’re converting visitors to buyers faster and more often.

2. E-commerce. Expand beyond your brick-and-mortar store. A.J. Madison started as a simple store in Brooklyn New York, selling to locals. Its expansive e-commerce site now has it sending appliances into all 50 states. This is a huge competitive advantage. Make sure your IT allows different online payment methods.

3. Supply Chain Management. A good IT program can make sure you have products exactly when you need them.  It can manage your inventory as well as the clerical supplies that keep offices running.

4. Customer Relationship Management. Nothing can destroy your business faster than poor customer relations. And few things can give you a better competitive advantage than a host of loyal customers. Use information technology to help you follow up with customers, hear and respond to complaints, and segment your customers to reward larger spenders.

5. Automation Software. Your automated programs can track numbers of sales, customers, and transaction details. It can make those numbers available across a variety of documents for taxes, customer follow up, and financial accounting. Paperwork is not glamorous, but when you save hours and dollars with excellent software, it becomes cool.

6. Collaboration Software. Quality programs help teams work together. It allows documents to easily be shared. On a basic level it connects computers, applications, printers, and internet connections. These simple steps save you time and money. They also make a more productive and satisfied, team.

7. Web Design. Each company wants to stand out.  With your unique website you can differentiate your products from your competitors.

8. Client Segmentation. Don’t waste your advertising dollars on clients who won’t buy. Use software to focus on those who do. Sophisticated information systems segment your list so you can target new buyers and big spenders and spend little time on “lookers.”

9. Privacy. Use IT to protect the confidential information of your customers and employees. Nothing breaks trust with your customers like a hacker stealing their credit information from your site. That extra layer of information technology can give you a competitive edge against other businesses in your field.

Ann, you don’t even need to use every one of these programs right away.  Choose the two or three areas in your business that could most benefit from streamlining, and start there.

Soon you’ll find ways your competitive advantage is bringing in more clients and more income for your company.  Information technology really does let you work smarter, faster, and with a lower cost.

To learn how your company can blow your competition out of the water, contact Joel.

Talkback: What programs or software have you used to give your business an advantage?