Conducting a Job Search?
Having a Plan is Critical

“One important key to success is self-confidence. An important key to self-confidence is preparation.”

~ Arthur Ashe ~

Client Garrett Asks: I’m considering a career change, but it’s been a while since I’ve had to look for a job. Is there anything I need to be aware of before I start my job search?   Coach Joel Answers: Whether you are unemployed or employed and looking for a job, you need to be prepared before the job search even begins. When you start your job search with a plan, your strategy, daily game plan and overall focus help you find the right job more quickly. Don’t be like most people who start a job search by immediately applying for jobs, sending out updated resumes and telling people the 4-5 jobs they want without any thought process before they jump …
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How Do Others Perceive You?
All You Have to Do Is Ask

“People seldom improve when they have no other model but themselves to copy after.”

~ Oliver Goldsmith ~

A client—we’ll call him Steve—told me he knew a man who sucked all the oxygen out of the room. This person was brilliant, but he talked way too much and annoyed everyone around him. He never knew this because people weren’t willing to tell him and he never asked for feedback on how he was perceived.

Do you know how you are perceived by others in your organization? Even if you think you do, do you really? One of the best ways find out is to simply ask.

Get feedback from your immediate manager, peer, someone you don’t report to, someone more senior than you, your boss’s boss, from your key customers or others outside the organization. Knowing how others perceive you plays …
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Conquer Your Critical Inner Voice

“I was always looking outside myself for strength and confidence, but it comes from within. It is there all the time.”

~ Anna Freud ~

When Your Inner Voice Keeps Telling You “No”

Client Suzanna Asks: Sometimes I think I am my own worst critic. I constantly catch myself thinking, “That wasn’t good enough” or “You really screwed up this time.” How can I turn this around?

Coach Joel Answers: Self-evaluation can be a positive experience. It helps us learn, correct our mistakes and improve our performance, as well as the perceptions others have of us.

According to psychologist Terry Paulson, it’s estimated that a typical person makes 300 to 400 self-evaluations every day.

That’s a lot of opportunities for self-improvement.

But here’s the rub.

Dr. Paulson says that, for most people, 80% of these self-evaluations are negative!


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Change Your Mindset:
Office Politics Isn’t a Dirty Word

“When we win on an issue we call it leadership. When we lose, we call it politics. Practicing politics simply means increasing your options for effective results.”

~ John Eldred ~

When my client, Miles, heard the phrase “office politics,” it brought up negative associations (backstabbing, kissing up, gossip, who you know gets you to advance). One way to embrace and capitalize on office politics is to get rid of the actual words “office” and “politics” so you won’t feel so charged by these words. Instead think of it as “company culture” or “building relationships” or “how work is done.” When you have a better and more positive perspective, you’ll be able to embrace what is actually happening and leverage it to your benefit.

Once Miles changed his mindset, he was able to use these eight tips to harness …
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The Five Pillars of Innovation

“There is no good idea that cannot be improved on.”

~ Michael Eisner ~

Client Miles Asks: Innovation is vital to our company’s success, but creativity is extremely difficult to regulate or control. How do we encourage innovation and avoid stifling creativity?

Coach Joel Answers: Today’s corporations face a harsh reality: innovate or die. Executives’ responses to this imperative have varied widely—ranging from instituting mandatory innovation training workshops to flat out requiring employees to innovate in designated areas.  Unfortunately, some companies try to reduce innovation to prescriptive formulas.

Take Kodak. After decades of success, non-engineering executives took control of R&D priorities and shoveled almost 95% of the company’s resources into existing core products. The result? Kodak went bankrupt.

To avoid Kodak’s fate, executives should consider following these five pillars of innovation leadership:

1. Innovation takes time. Leaders who expect immediate results …
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